Tag: Tourism trends

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Cultural Tourism: Four Examples of How It Works for Destinations

According to the World Tourism Organization cultural tourism accounts for 37% of global tourism, and furthermore affirms that it will continue to grow 15% each year. With all of this market interest, destinations should leverage what makes their societies unique and invest in developing cultural tourism programs.

What is Cultural Tourism?

Cultural tourism allows travelers to be immersed in local rituals and routines, taking away not only pretty photos but also shared memories of unique experiences. For destinations, it encourages local communities to embrace their culture and boosts economic growth. Developing culturally geared tourism programs encourages destinations to celebrate and promote what distinguishes their communities, and in doing so, provides the opportunity for authentic cultural exchange between locals and visitors. The following four case studies illustrate how cultural tourism can be developed.

Morocco: Down the Road of Traditional Crafts

Before 2010, Morocco has a vibrant craft industry, yet artisans had insufficient opportunity for direct sales. Aid to Artisans and the Moroccan Ministry of Crafts cooperated to facilitate direct linkages between artisans and tourists in Marrakech and Fez. This was achieved through establishing new or updating existing artisan and cultural heritage routes, and furnishing them with engaging creating marketing collateral. The team involved as many as 6,603 sale points and was successful in increasing artisan revenue. As a result of this project, crafts and tourism in the area are now more linked than ever before.

Ethiopia: Empowering Community Enterprises for Long-term Success

Ethiopia’s Bale Mountain area is lush and beautiful, and is the home of successful community-led tourism initiatives. The conservation and regulation problems in Ethiopia were addressed by affecting a sustainable tourism development project in partnership with the Frankfurt Zoological Society. The team created 7 community tourism enterprises as well as branding and marketing tools aimed at awareness-building among foreigners and locals alike. The local communities now leverage their cultural heritage, which includes expressive dances and crafts, in its tourism development. This offers them alternative livelihoods that in turn benefit environmental conservation.

Namibia: From North America to Local Villages

 Namibia is a country of rich tourism potential that prior to 2010 had not been successful in fully captivating the North American travel market. A comprehensive trade-focused marketing campaign was launched with the goal of increasing North American arrivals in Namibia over the course of 4 years. By fostering partnerships between Namibian and North American trade, and leading destinations awareness campaigns, this mission was successful.

 Community-based tourism was a large component in promoting the country to the North American market. The campaign succeeded in increasing the number of tourists and routes visiting Namibia by 75% by 2013, exceeding expectations. This helped improve local employment opportunities and enhance cultural awareness among international visitors.

Colombia: More than Whales at Nuquí/Utría National Park

Nuquí/Utría National Park is famous for its prolific whale watching opportunities. However, it suffers from a lack of organizational and business capacity, as well as weak marketing outreach. In 2012, the challenge was tackled by creating a destination marketing alliance with four local community tourism enterprises, providing them capacity building trainings. The team developed and promoted new tour packages that incorporated cultural elements, such as visits to a typical Pacific Chocó village. The team liaised with the Colombian Ministries of Tourism and the Environment to feature the park as a model for sustainable tourism development in a protected area. Through this work, the team was successful in increasing the gross sales of each of these community tourism enterprises and the number of tourism products in this remote area.

This blog post is from www.solimarinternational.com/resources-page/blog/itemlist/tag/Destination%20Management

Business trendsIntelligenceMarketing 3.0Tourism trends

The next generation has arrived

Facebook.  Snapchat. Airbnb. easyJet, TripAdvisor. Tinder. Instagram. What do all these have in common? Yes, they’re all popular apps and websites (some apps never even had to bother to build their own webpage…that’s SO 1999!). They have also coincided with, and been driven by a generation: the Millennial generation.

Born during the 80s and 90s and consuming independently (as teenagers and post-teens anytime after the year 2000), the Millennium generation has, consistently broken with tradition and found new ways of living, working and of course, traveling; something that’s proved hard for major global corporations to keep up with, never mind tourism destinations.

While it’s hard to define the traveling behavior of an entire generation (though this Huffpost article does makes a good attempt), probably the characteristic that defines them the best is the way they have grasped technology and used it to their advantage: to get instant recommendations from friends, to find cheap (or free) accommodation, to escape the crowds and to meet new people.

Of course, all ages are able to enjoy the same access to apps and web platforms that allow these things to happen, but Millennials are the first generation to have grown up with the internet 24/7 so the web is the first port of call when looking to solve any travel related issue, before, during and after the journey.

As well as being the first generation to grow up in the era of ‘internet everywhere’ this generation, in Europe and North America at least, entered adulthood as the global economic crisis took hold. House prices rose, banks stopped handing over credit like they used to, and whole industries (and with them, job opportunities) have moved to far-away lands. All this has created a sense of doubt among Millennials that they will enjoy the same economic prosperity that their parents did. No matter though, because fortunately this is also the generation of #YOLO (you only live once) and the travel industry has noticed this, with Millennials traveling a lot, spending more than their parents, and seeking intense experiences everywhere they go.

All this undoubtedly creates a complex picture for anyone looking to define their tourism business or destination’s strategy for capturing and nurturing the Millennials market.

This blog post is from   http://www.toposophy.com/insights/insight/?bid=393

Collaborative business modelsIntelligenceStrategyTourism trends

The pressure is on for destinations to make the sharing economy work fairly for all

UBER and Airbnb were recently announced as the two most valuable travel startups in the world, recently valued at $40 billion and $20 billion respectively. Last year Airbnb processed nearly 1 million bookings per month, while UBER drivers took passengers on 1 million rides per day!

It’s not hard to see why hoteliers and taxi drivers around the globe are stepping up the pressure on legislators to clamp down on what may label as the ‘black economy’. In San Fransisco, the debate about the success of law enforcement and potential legislation revisions has already begun just one month after the short-term rental ordinance took effect, with both lawmakers and hosts expressing concerns about limited staff resources and complex registration procedures. In the meantime, Uber and Starwood have recently launched their own partnership, blurring the lines between traditional and contemporary providers of travel services by allowing travelers to accumulate Starpoints while riding with Uber drivers.

Legislation on short term accommodation rentals and local taxi transport is usually down to politicians at municipal or regional level to solve, and many have found themselves in legal deep water as they have struggled to meet the demands of hoteliers and taxi drivers, while being reluctant to shut off the flow of visitors who use and enjoy the flexibility and unique experiences that short term renting brings.

The above concerns and many more where echoed at ITB. Over the course of various seminars, directors of Europe’s top DMOs, hotel groups, limo firms, lawyers and representatives of the top sharing economy platforms got their chance to air their views on the sharing economy. CEO of VisitBerlin Bernard Kieker made his views clear: “We do not want Berlin to become an Airbnb city where local residents are priced out of their apartments” while acknowledging the additional streams of visitors that were coming to the city precisely because this option is currently available (though perhaps not on such a large scale for much longer).

CONTROVERSIAL, BUT ALSO SMART

Pierre-Dimitri Gore-Coty, General Manager for Western Europe of Uber explained his firm’s position in a different way: “Our main competitor is not the taxi driver, it is the very concept of car ownership”. With 1 billion cars on the planet only being used 4% of the time, Uber’s target customer is the customer who given up his or her own car in favor of shared rides. This raises the broader question of how sharing economy platforms can be used to help solve some destinations’ biggest problems, not least traffic congestion or hotel capacity during conference season.

While politicians argue over the subject (or try to look the other way), local residents continue to offer their accommodation to visitors and visitors get hooked on the practical benefits of using shared resources such as apartments, cars, bikes, boats and much else.

This blog post is from   http://www.toposophy.com/insights/insight/?bid=398

Environmental sustainabilityMarketing 3.0SustainabilityThird sector and social sustainabilityTourism marketing

Destination Marketing for Voluntourism

Increased awareness of world issues and global needs has led to a rise in the desire to help others abroad. Travelers want to reconnect with humanity, find a sense of meaning, and help their global neighbors in a hands-on way, rather than simply through monetary contributions. While there has been some push-back questioning the merits of voluntourism, many eager travelers are still looking for opportunities where their time and skills will be useful to others.

What is Voluntourism?

Voluntourism, the responsible travel experience which combines helping, learning, and exotic traveling, is becoming increasingly popular for people of all ages who are concerned with world issues and social responsibility. Travelers use their holidays to give back to others, rather than as pure recreation. These trips can be anywhere in length from a few days to a few months. Projects can involve teaching, building schools or other infrastructure, helping with agriculture, or assisting with disaster relief.

Participants typically pay their own expenses when volunteering abroad, but some costs can be tax-deductible. In exchange for their time, voluntourists typically receive an affordable alternative to a vacation that includes orientation, language and technical training, a safe place to live and work under conditions common to the country, and a network of logistical staff to help plan the trip.

Types of Voluntourism

1. Philanthropic or donor travel. Travel philanthropy differs from other types of voluntourism in that its purpose is to supplement a philanthropic gift. Charitable organizations sometimes plan or even sponsor trips for their donors so that they can experience first-hand the work that the organization is doing. The trip could be intended to research a cause, establish a relationship with the recipient, or as reassurance that a philanthropic gift is worthwhile.

2. Private or group travel. Individuals or groups who want a charitable experience during vacation can participate in cultural or community exchanges in which they can volunteer their time. Families, groups, or individuals can create their own voluntourism holiday with a tour operator or join an existing trip with an organization.

3. Urgent service travel and disaster relief. There is an abundance of intense volunteer opportunities in second-response disaster zones after any type of natural disaster. This type of voluntourism tends to be less expensive than other types, although some organizations require that the participants raise additional donations above the cost of the trip. Skilled professionals like doctors and construction workers are in high demand, though almost anyone can help to provide immediate relief.

Voluntourism Marketing Strategies for Destinations:

  • Review the region’s current service assets to identify unique opportunities for visitors.Creativity and uniqueness are important, because travelers have a variety of volunteer opportunities to choose from. Offering one-of-a-kind experiences to travelers with differentiate a destination from its competitors.
  • Build on exisiting organizational relationships.Choose service projects that will also support tourism-related causes, issues, and events, such as museums, zoos, historic buildings, national parks, and conservation efforts that will interest tourists as well as connect them to the region’s other offerings.
  • Add information about volunteering to destination websites. The Alabama Gulf Coast’s website promotes future travel experiences in voluntourism on its website and across its social media platforms as a fun activity to participate in that will preserve the coast for generations to come.
  • Create a catalog of volunteering options for travel planners.Providing a program of unique voluntourism activities will interest tour operators as well as individual travelers. For example, partnering with zoos and national parks can provide sustainable conservation opportunities, while arts programs and museums can provide cultural opportunities for volunteers.

This blog post is from  www.solimarinternational.com/resources-page/blog/itemlist/tag/Destination%20Management?start=10

Collaborative business modelsTourism trends

Sharing economy and tourism: seeing the elefant in the room

With the aim of monitoring the growth and influence of sharing economy in the wider field of travel services, many institutions such as the Institute for Tourism Planning and Development from Portugal in their ‘Tourism Trends Review‘ have highlighted the impact and evolution of this phenomena:
As a new style of peer-to-peer (P2P) commerce, sharing economy does not merely involve an unusually large number of options for transport, accommodation, and recreation activities. It has also provoked a shift in role of service user and provider. In this environment, contemporary consumers can openly express their individual interpretations of tourism product uniqueness and authenticity as well as indulge themselves in an imaginative manner while moving around well-known and emerging destinations.

This issue was also discussed in 2015 during the 1st Semi-Annual Meeting of the European Travel Agents’ and Tour Operators’ Association with ECTAA and HOTREC representatives and Ms. Elżbieta Bieńkowska, European Commissioner for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs of the European Commission.

In the European Cities Marketing Annual meeting of CEOs of Capital and Major Cities 2015, was an occasion to examine latest destination trends at an influential policy level and focus on the respective impact of sharing economy stakeholders. In two sessions, brainstorming between ECM members and a vivid debate with Airbnb also shed light on what it takes for destination authorities and P2P platforms to work together and deal with issues of common interest over the provision and consumption of travel services. Particular emphasis was also given in exchanging views with representatives from Barcelona and Amsterdam, two cities which have already developed approaches to sharing economy and monitor their results.
It is a fact, however, that both these influential events were only the tip of the iceberg during a busy 2015 including relevant speaker engagements in countries such as Israel, Montenegro, Belgium, Estonia, Croatia, Greece, Portugal, Latvia, and the UK. In all these cases there were moments of great empirical value, especially when we were given the opportunity:

– To realize how market dynamics together with latest statements of UNWTO/EC officials put sharing economy on the spot in this year’s World Travel Market, while only on the sidelines last year.

– To take a look at the actual results of Tel Aviv’s recent partnership with Airbnb to promote the city in joint manner and exchange views with representatives from Barcelona and Amsterdam, two cities which have already developed approaches to sharing economy and monitor their results.

– To learn under what conditions sharing-economy friendly legislation has been in place for decades in Croatia and how hotels team up with BnB apartments and offer them concierge services.

To concentrate for the purpose of this blog post on HOTREC project, the key objectives of the policy paper were to understand the various issues that arise due to the fast growth Short-Term Private Accommodation Rentals (STR) and contribute to the development of a suitable regulatory environment to level the playing field.

When traveling for business or leisure, booking a private house or apartment to stay in via a P2P platform is seen as a trendy and affordable choice: booking, arriving, collecting the key and making oneself, quite literally ‘at home’. More importantly, a simple fact is already common knowledge.

Although the Global Economic Crisis reinforced an interest towards the more effective use of existing resources and the development of new sources of income, advances in technology such as social media and mobile devices accounted for the strongest driver of the sharing and trading of private assets particularly in the case of travel and tourism services.

To examine how the STR have evolved in recent years and transformed the ‘playing field’ for all those involved in offering visitor accommodation, HOTREC policy paper takes into account the following perspectives and international trends.

Business growth: From 2010 to 2015 venture capital firms have invested billions in the “sharing” economy start-ups, with the sectors of transportation and accommodation receiving the biggest shares of funds. Major companies such as Facebook and Amazon are also included lately among potential entrants to the “sharing” economy through the development of peer-to-peer services and partnership-building with existing start-ups.

Consumption patterns: Younger generations (Millennials are commonly identified as those born between 1980 and 1999, and who entered their teenage years as from the year 2000, putting them currently in the 18-35 age group) appreciate a lot customization in customer service at a global level as enabled by technological advancements. P2P Platforms have been effective in using global tools to enhance interaction between service providers and users at local level as well as in providing affordable options for value-seeking Millennials.

–  Entrepreneurial mobility: P2P platforms are  also providing a range of products and services for a new type of footloose global entrepreneur, often freelancing or part of a SME (of which there are now many more, in the wake of technological developments and the global economic crisis). “The way we think about long-term residents versus an emergent and more globalized and mobile population” is actually changing due to the growing appeal of P2P services in transportation, accommodation, and all sectors defining the business travel experience.

–  Forms of employment: P2P platforms provide alternative sources of income to individual service providers, who opt to work as micro-entrepreneurs of the freelance economy. A gradual transition from contractor to employee relationships is however less likely to happen in the accommodation sector, where properties are managed by their owners or tenants. The issue lies in that the sum of individual and commercial activity undercuts hotels on price. When there is also a negative effect on hotel revenues and jobs, it might be another case where technological progress has not yet proved to be a driver for jobs creation.

–  High-level policy making: The activity of the “sharing” economy start-ups has also drawn the attention of national governments and supra-national agencies. Elements of innovation are not rejected in principle, yet political parties in countries such the UK and Canada already participate in a vivid exchange of both positive and negative views on the “sharing” economy.

As these perspectives frame the discussion of various issues including terminology and scales of activity together with suggestions for legislative work, you can a have a look at the HOTREC Policy Paper if you’d like up-to-date knowledge on the agenda of Short-Term Private Accommodation Rentals or even share your thoughts with us.

This blogpost is from  http://www.toposophy.com/insights/insight/?bid=418

Business model innovationCollaborative business modelsCollaborative cultureInnovationTourism trends

Serving up a storm

What the sharing economy has done to accommodation and transport, it is now doing to food and fine dining.

Peru has been top of my wish-list for many years, and while the country’s stunning landscapes and rich Inca heritage were an obvious attraction, my main motivation to fly for nearly 13 hours from London to Lima was the country’s food.

The country may be seem quite remote for those of us in Europe or North America, but its cuisine has been undergoing a steady rise in popularity in big cities around the world. With a heavy emphasis on fresh produce, unique flavors and local ingredients, Peruvian food (and drink) really does stand out as one of the world’s finest.

By designing my trip around opportunities to try as many different foods in as many different settings as possible, I joined the many millions of travelers globally who are putting food at the center of their travel plans. This megatrend has certainly caught on around the world, to the extent that in its 2016 Megatrends report, Skift declared food as ‘the leading hook in travel’.

Increasing numbers of destinations and travel businesses are responding to this demand by using food to transform their brand image: just think of Copenhagen’s promotion of Danish cuisine on the back of the top-rated restaurant Noma, or the many airlines that are upgrading the food and drink they offer on board, flying dedicated chefs between continents to keep their customers happy and well-fed. Brand transformations and new food-tourism concepts are springing up on a daily basis, all fueled by mobile devices, P2P platforms and social media. Events that bring new places to eat and drink to the fore, such Dine Athens Restaurant Week by Diners Club bring locals and visitors together to share new food concepts every day. With so much going on, it can be hard to keep track of it all!

It’s time to come to terms with the fact that, just as with accommodation and transport, more and more individuals are starting to offer services and experiences directly to visitors, bypassing traditional tourism businesses such as bars and restaurants. Examples include meal-sharing platforms such as Withlocals or Eatwith, but there are many other platforms offering other concepts that connect travelers with food and drink. Just as we’ve seen with accommodation, the rapidly-growing numbers of travelers who go to strangers’ houses for dinner do it not for the novelty, but because they see it as part of their way of life. Consumers are also increasingly interested in their own diet, fitness and where their food comes from. These provide just a few reasons why this phenomenon is here to stay.
If increasing numbers of travelers are buying experiences directly from local people, and discovering the destination through the eyes of a local, then doesn’t it make sense for destination management and marketing authorities to get involved? Local people are rapidly becoming part of the destination’s brand and are taking on the promotion themselves.
While we believe that this is definitely something to be celebrated, it does raise some difficult questions over the role of local authorities in formally involving these local people in their destination marketing and management, as well as how they can ensure quality and safety for visitors. We understand that these are big questions to handle for DMOs that are short on time and resources, especially since the world of P2P platforms, their listings and partnerships grow and change so quickly.

To help answer these questions, last month Toposophy in partnership with European Cities Marketing produced a free, practical guide for DMOs on how to successfully integrate sharing economy services into what they do, and use it as a tool for improving how they manage destinations. It also gives tips on how to form partnerships with existing platforms, something which can potentially cause conflict with ‘traditional’ tourism service providers if not handled properly.

With this in mind, here’s a summary of the presentation to the CityFair audience in London:

  • Get involved: The sharing economy is here to stay, and consumers are rapidly converting to using the many services on offer. It’s in your interest and theirs to join the conversation.
  • Do an audit: Do a deep analysis of P2P platforms to understand how your destination is being promoted by local people, and how this fits (or not) with what you’re already doing
  • Set your policy goals: Thinking beyond tourism, what are your organization’s policy goals for local people, and how can you use P2P platforms to help support these through providing tourism services?
  • See the sharing economy as a useful management tool: Check out our detailed infographic to discover how the sharing economy can boost the visitor experience, as well as improving city management and local social cohesion.
  • Build partnerships based on your goals: Work with platforms and partners that are aligned with the policy goals (note: they’re not always directly linked to tourism experiences) that your organization wants to achieve. It’s fundamental to put local people first.
  • See tech as a way of putting your local cuisine on the world stage: Whether through events such as the Restaurant Week we ran in Athens or working with tour-guide apps to bring people to specific places, tech is providing a window for something that’s unique to your destination: the food, drink and the people who create it.

This blog post is from     www.toposophy.com/insights/insight/?bid=428

Collaborative business modelsIntelligenceTourism trends

How Airbnb has given local restaurants a boost

The AirBnB phenomenon was not a completely ground breaking concept. The concept of staying at a guesthouse and kipping in a spare room has been around for for centuries. The Pubs and Inns of the 1600’s often had a room for weary (and drunk) passers by to rest their tired souls in exchange for a shilling or two.

What AirBnB has done so well is use technology to make it easier for this to happen in advance of a stay and allow those who have not thought about renting out a spare room or making a little extra cash, to do so.

The slogan they use of “ Live Like a Local” is something that I really like and something that I certainly did when I backpacked through south east Asia. I stayed in a lot of guesthouses which not only made me feel at home, but also gave me an authentic experience that i talk about to this day.

If you look at my home city London, there are over 20000 beds available to rent on AirBnB and although it is a threat in many ways to the hotel and hostel sector in regards increased stock, I think it has led to a new positive shift for other hospitality businesses.

For me living like a local doesn’t mean just your accommodation…
It means the full experience. For me this starts with food (I am a food lover after all). Back in 2003, in the first guesthouse I stayed in , in Hanoi, the first thing I did was sit with the mother of the household, and have a cup of tea and a bowl of freshly cooked Pho. Amazing… and experience I still talk about to this day.

Fast forward to 2016, and you look at the boom in street food, food markets and pop-up restaurants in London and you can see the shift in food culture which in turn creates a new form of tourism where people want to eat, drink and sleep like a local! The full “Living like a local” experience.

I found an awesome BBQ joint when on a business trip to De Moines, Iowa (Called Jethrows in case your interested, 8 types of BBQ sauce, amazing Ribs & featured on Man Vs Food!) by going on Facebook and using the “Near Me” functionality and could see great ratings by people who I didn’t know but were probably “locals” . I in theory asked the local crowd where was good to go and that answer was delivered to me.

Those restaurants and food outlets that are aware of the shift in travelers demands, and are active in their restaurant marketing , must be finding a new wave of different tourists (not always from abroad!) that find their local venue through the web, word of mouth, social media or food bloggers insights. Restaurants and other foodie places offering unique and authentic experiences, alongside quality service and food, will be a success in my opinion.

I think there is an opportunity for more strategic thinking between the likes of AirBnB and gastronomic outlets in regards encouraging the “eat like a local opportunities” to their customers rather than traveler being lured into the big branded places.

I think the opportunity is there for smaller restaurant operators to really fly, as long as they make themselves accessible through simple marketing and provide consistently authentic experiences to their customers to make them feel like a local, whether they are or not.

This blog post is from  www.toposophy.com/insights/insight/?bid=433

IntelligenceTourism trends

Some millennials will be driving future tourism growth faster

Think back to your geography classes at school and you may remember studying population pyramids, those diagrams used to show the relative size of different gender and age groups in any given country. Take a look at the population pyramid for most countries in Western Europe and you’ll see a ‘Y’ shape, with a relatively large number of older age groups (the baby boomers), and a comparatively reduced population among the younger age groups. Now go and check out the population pyramids for nations in Southeast Asia, such as Indonesia, Vietnam or the Philippines. You’ll find a cone in the shape of a Thai palace: very heavy at the bottom (with a booming youth population) and very thin towards the top.

Last week I was in Manila to give a presentation at the opening session of MICECON, the national tourism conference of the Philippines. During the few days I was in the country, I was able to see first-hand how young the country is, with millions of children, teenagers and young adults streaming around Manila’s busy streets and malls. The Philippines is a collection of over 7,000 islands that lies in the Pacific, south of Taiwan and north of Indonesia. It’s had a rocky history, variously governed in the past three centuries by Spain, the US and occupying Japanese forces. During the late 20th the country was run by a General Marcos (remember his wife Imelda’s famed collection of shoes?) and has long suffered as one of the poorer Asian nations.

Today however, the country is both generating and benefiting from the wider economic boom in Asia. English is widely spoken by Filipinos, who go for coveted jobs at the country’s growing number of outsourced-call centres. The Asian Development Bank forecasts GDP growth of 6.4% in 2015 and international arrivals in 2014 reached nearly 5 million with the government aiming for strong growth in the coming years. Domestic travel is extremely important since Filipinos largely seek to explore their own country before heading for trips abroad, and there is still much more room for growth among a population which totals over 100 million.

A youthful country preparing for strong growth in the future

Aware that the country’s tourism fortunes will increasingly rest on the Millennial generation from Asia and further afield, the Philippines Department of Tourism invited me to speak at the opening of MICECON, the Filipino national tourism conference to share some insights into the Millennials market, in particular those travelling from other Asian countries. As you may know, Toposphy is already working with the Pacific Asia Travel Association to study the way Asian Millennials travel, in an exciting project called ‘Stepping Out of the Crowd’, and we hope to add this to our insights in the months to come.

At MICECON, it turned out that ‘Millennials’ was the word of the day as the audience in every session asked plenty of questions on this subject. The Filipino travel industry is especially interested in younger travelers, and the reason starts at home. Young Filipinos grow up knowing that their country is a diverse and exciting place to explore, and they usually set out to do just that before heading overseas. Whether it’s for upgrading the country’s supply of accommodation or understanding how to make the most of the boom in Korean students coming to study English (estimates show that nearly 70% of Filipinos are fluent in English), delegates from hotel groups, tour operators and airlines expressed a strong desire to learn more about the Millennial mind-set and apply lessons to their own businesses.

The Philippines today has some strong competitors for many of its products and to some extent, its fragmented nature and distance from mature outbound markets such as the US, Canada and Europe are a disadvantage. The government has also recognized that transport infrastructure is lacking too, but is working hard to overcome these challenges. The country certainly has some outstanding assets, including beaches that match the best of the Caribbean, amazing diving opportunities, beautiful rice terraces, and some well-preserved UNESCO recognized heritage from the 300-year long Spanish era.

Still, in my opinion it’s the people who will truly place the Philippines at a competitive advantage in the years to come. Before arriving in the country I was familiar with the country’s slogan ‘It’s More Fun in the Philippines’ though I must admit I thought it was a cheesy slogan just like any other. A visit to 3 cities in five days taught me that this slogan really is the best possible description for what you’ll find there! Fiestas in the street, a love of karaoke, friendly neighborhood barbecues, articulate guides and warm hearted generosity seemed in abundance. Even the conferences are more fun, with MICECON proving that tourism conferences don’t always have to be stuffy, formal affairs for the industry of fun and enjoyment. At this year’s event, delegates happily dressed by the theme ‘Flower Power’ and danced their way through the conference lunch!

Given that competition is so tough from neighboring countries, it’s promising that the Filipino government and the wider industry have recognized that they need to start building up their knowledge about Millennials in order to design the right products and marketing messaging for the near future. MICECON was a great first step to doing this.

Toposophy will be there to support them on this journey as they seek more creative ways to engage with Millennials in the future.

This blogpost is from   http://www.toposophy.com/insights/insight/?bid=412

Tourism trends

Special interest tourism experiences

One of the segments with greater growth is no doubt the Special interest travel. Since traveling has become more accessible to most layers of the society, and there is plenty of information available about all types of resources worldwide, passion and mission driven people like to meet other like-minded individuals to share their passion with, to discover new resources related to their hobby or passion, or to expand internationally the impact of the mission they work for. It would be possible to draft an almost endless list of special interest tourism products, but hereby we list just a few to illustrate the concept. These are also usually classified in market niches, like the following:

Wildlife tourism niche. From volunteering to just observation and education, wildlife is a very rich source of memorable experiences and emotions. There are many volunteering programs to help in the protection of endangered species in countries especially rich in biodiversity like Madagascar, Galapagos (Ecuador) or Costa Rica. But you can also volunteer in the Panda Protection Center in Chengdu (China), to help the Panda bears’ carers in the maintenance of the bears’ spaces, prepare their food or collaborate with the veterinaries. Another special case is the Gorilla and Chimpanze protection programs in African countries like Cameroon, Guinea, Kenya, Uganda or Sierra Leone, where there are many centers rescuing these primates to take care of them and foster reproduction. The Jane Goodall Institute is one of the best centers, where they look for professional volunteers to work for long periods of time.

In case you only wish to observe and learn, the options are much varied. From birdwatching in some of the best marshland parks or in times of migration, to a photography safari to learn both about the animals’ life and the art of photography, there is a vast offer available in almost all continents. In this section there could be also included the Diving tourism niche, so long as one of its main attractions is to enjoy the submarine wildlife.

Archeology tourism niche. Films like Indiana Jones have aroused interest and passion for archeology, giving it a sense of fascinating adventure. This has resulted in the development of a considerable offer of tourism products related to it. Visiting historic sites guided by an archeologist and/or a historian making you envision the world in which these buildings and monuments were created is somehow like a trip to the old civilizations. Some of the top destinations in this niche market are Egypt, Mexico –both Maya and Azteca civilizations-, Peru –Inca civilization-, Israel, Greece, Italy, Iran, etc.

Music tourism niche. Beyond traveling to attend a concert or a festival, there are many other possible music motivated holiday programs. There are guided tours visiting the houses of famous musicians, others visiting the backstage of famous venues such as La Scala in Milan, and others visiting museums related to music. Italy, Austria and Germany are the top destinations for this niche market, as they were the nations where most classical musicians were born.

Women issues niche. The agency Focus on women organizes tours to learn about the role of different types of women in all types of societies. This concept encompasses tours to talk with Geishas or Sumo fighters in Japan, meeting with women in the Chii society of Iran who strive to develop themselves despite suffering from serious gender discrimination, talking to women who work to prevent arranged marriages among minor girls in Ethiopia, or talking to women from the Hmong group in Vietnam who open trails in the Sapa valleys in the north of the country.

These four are just a short glimpse of the enormous variety of holiday programs dedicated to special interests related to activity holidays, culture and well-being.

Which are the most original special interest tours you have ever known of?

IntelligenceMarketing 3.0Tourism trends

Future tourists

Amadeus has recently presented a survey explaining how the tourists will be in 2030 (Future Travel Tribes 2030). This report has been elaborated with the Future Foundation and through it we can have clues about how tourists will travel in 15 years. Anticipation and knowledge will be the key success factors both for businesses and destinations.

Destination service suppliers, developed products, the means used to provide services and manage revenues, the relationship with the clients and the level of knowledge about them, will play an essential role in satisfying the increasingly exigent customers.

For instance, businesses and destinations with both qualitative and quantitative data about their clients will be able to approach clients optimally before they come to the destination. They will be able to adapt their services and put the surprise effect into practice. The tourist loyalty will be linked to the degree of approach we have towards customers, on how well we know them and how much we can engage with them.

The report presents 6 types of tourists or market segments:

  1. Social capital searchers: they plan their holidays in accordance with their network, experts and others’ recommendations and opinions. In this segment, businesses focusing their marketing through the social networks clearly have an advantage to gain these tourists. Other platforms such as Tripadvisor favor the growth of this segment. There are also many blogs dedicated to traveling with a broad influence in this segment. Destinations usually organize bloggers trips to leverage their influence power as they do with the journalists.

Other initiatives such as Hidden Cash create a partnership between the destination and an operator –airline, train, tour-operator, etc.- to make a campaign promoting both the destination and the operator. For instance, Santiago de Compostela and Easyjet organized a game in which there were 10 hidden flight tickets throughout the city, which generated great buzz in the social networks.

  1. Cultural purists: in this case there are some travel agencies which are capable of crafting a tailored holiday with a high degree of authenticity. This segment’s tourists want to learn everything about the destination, regardless of the discomforts it may entail. This is an opportunity for all those businesses and destinations that may offer experiences related with cultural education, cultural immersion, etc. This corresponds to the type of tourism that used to motivate traveling in the past, focused on learning about the destination, its culture and its people.
  2. Committed travelers: all those businesses and destinations working actively in CSR policies can be considered in this segment. These travelers know that the money they spend during their holiday goes in favor of the local communities’ businesses and its environment, in a way that destinations revenues contribute effectively to the sustainable development of the destination. Therefore, businesses and destinations focused on a mission-driven development are to be the winners in this segment. This type of tourists is also called Tourists 3.0.

A good example may be Hostal Spa Empuries, focused on the environment protection. It is certified with the Leed Gold (certification in sustainable architecture) and works based on the principle of “CradletoCradle” or “C2C”, which entails working with sustainable materials which can be reused after being used for its present purpose in the Hotel architecture.

  1. Comfort lovers: tour-operators and travel agencies working with the traditional package format are to satisfy these segment’s tourists. However, these tourists are likely to be increasingly exigent and clear about the expectations to meet. Therefore, this is an opportunity for the traditional travel agencies and operators, though they will need to gain insightful knowledge about their clients.
  2. Business travelers: innovative businesses providing fast technological solutions are likely to get a good share of this segment’s business. For instance, NH Hoteles, which defines itself as a firm where future is present, works on innovation from the inside, being one of the core values within the corporate culture. That means that they dedicate part of their time to manage internal knowledge, to develop talent within their human resources, and to co-create solutions to their challenges.

NH offers futuristic experiences for the MICE segment. From now on, in some of its hotels, meetings can be held through a 3D holographic technology system, which makes that the image of the person represented by a 3D hologram is present in the meeting in real size. In this way, clients may hold real time meetings as if they were in many places at a time. This service sets NH Hoteles apart as one of the most innovative hotel chains.

Those businesses that understand that time is gold for their clients and find innovative solutions –usually technology based- to save time for their clients are likely to gain a good share of this market segment, one of the most profitable.

  1. Luxury enthusiasts: among the wealthiest clients there will always be a segment of the most exigent, who like to set themselves apart from other travelers by enjoying high end services and experiences. However, these clients are also likely to be among the most loyal, both in good and bad times. Businesses operating in this segment have to bear in mind that for these clients, their holidays are an extraordinary reward, for which they are ready to pay whatever it costs. And they take this type of holidays also to satisfy their need to feel exclusive and to feel that they are doing something unique. There are nowadays many agencies focusing on this type of high-end tourism. Only in Spain, there is Made for Spain, Plenia, Shik Barcelona, Kakdoma Barcelona, Marbella Exclusive, toda la red de agencias Virtuoso, etc.

These are companies usually focused on international targets to whom they offer co-creation of the experience they want to live, ensuring high-end ingredients and exclusivity. The concept for this business is “only for you, and with us”.  For these businesses there is the challenge of catching the luxury trends and being able to offer the best of the best adapted to the clients wishes.

This blogpost is from http://www.visionesdelturismo.es/turistas-del-futuro/