Tag: strategy planning

StrategyStrategy planning & execution

The World Bank builds country ownership in the National Tourism Strategy of Georgia

Tourism strategic planning is a comprehensive process for determining what a business or destination should become and the steps needed to achieve that goal. Many times when consultants are hired to create a strategic plan, the plan is at risk of remaining on the shelf and never being fully implemented. Why? Because those most affected by the tourism development plan may not have been fully integrated into the development of the strategy, and may not agree with the ideas. This is an ongoing issue the tourism industry faces, and a difficult one in which to find a solution.

The World Bank and the Georgia National Tourism Administration (GNTA) recognized this problem in the past. As part of the solution, they decided to develop a tourism strategy for the Caucasus nation. The consultants were asked not to lead the development of the strategy, but rather facilitate and guide the GNTA through the strategy development process to ensure it was collaborative and comprehensive as possible.

Between the years 2009 and 2013, Georgia’s international tourism arrivals grew over 300%. This was largely in part to its envious location at the crossroads of Europe, Asia and the Middle East, as well as increasing amounts of exposure in international press as a unique, exciting destination. Georgia is the birth place of wine, has an exquisite culinary tradition, a rich early Christian history, and an abundance of natural assets – including 7 national parks. These attributes – if developed practically – demonstrate a significant strength to the country’s tourism sector within the high-value European marketplace, while improving the industry’s ability to contribute economically.

To keep pace with the increasing demand for tourism in Georgia, additional financing for private and public investments will be necessary. “The joint World Bank and IFC collaboration [in Georgia] focuses on fostering entrepreneurship and access to finance, improving the investment climate, and developing Georgia’s tourism strategy that will determine how to improve the sector’s performance, align implementation priorities and enable job growth.” said Henry Kerali, World Bank Regional Director for the South Caucasus.

Georgia’s tourism development approach has generally been focused on regional advancements rather than a cohesive national-level plan. However, to maximize tourism’s national impact, a national strategy is required that takes into consideration large scale infrastructure and marketing activities that cannot be achieved by the regions alone.

 “The tourism sector currently provides nearly 20 percent of export earnings. The national tourism development strategy is, therefore, an instrument to take full advantage of Georgia’s potential and position it globally as a rich, diversified and high quality destination.” Ahmed Eiweida, Program Leader for Sustainable Development Programs in the South Caucasus.

Where is the Georgia National Tourism Administration now?

With the support of the World Bank, the GNTA produced a 2025 strategic plan that articulates the country’s current position, its vision for the future, and the key activities required in order to get there.
To build buy-in for the strategy, the GNTA led regional workshops, communicated with inter-government committees, issued press events and integrated action plans from other tourism-related sectors. The final document describes how the GNTA and its partners will deliver creative marketing to attract to higher income markets and statistical projections on how the GNTA will achieve a minimum of 5% growth rate over the next 10 years.

Where does Georgia National Tourism want to be in 2025?

The GNTA envisions the country as a premier, year-round, high quality tourism destination – a destination centered on its unique cultural and natural heritage, its world-class customer service, and timeless tradition of hospitality. The GNTA will be at the forefront of tourism competitiveness, through strategic investments in infrastructure, education, marketing, and the development of unique Georgian visitor experiences that appeal to high-value markets around the globe.

How does the GNTA lead the tourism industry to reach it’s vision?

Extensive stakeholder consultation resulted in the identification of 50 priority actions that have been grouped around the following 8 strategic objectives.

1.Respect, enhance, and protect Georgia’s natural and cultural heritage
2. Create unique and authentic visitor experiences centered on those natural and cultural assets
3. Enhance competitiveness, through delivery of world-class visitor services
4. Attract higher spending markets, through increased and more effective marketing and promotion
5. Expand and enhance Georgia’s ability to collect and analyze tourism data and measure industry performance
6. Enhance the business environment, to facilitate increased foreign and domestic investment
7. Expand public and private sector investment in the tourism sector
8. Build partnerships between government, industry, non-governmental organizations, and communities that will be needed to achieve all of the above

What will the challenges be?

Even though the GNTA has completed their strategic plan and found positive monetary incentive to start implementation; the national and regional tourism stakeholders must work as a team to have success. And most importantly, the 2025 strategic plan will only be effective if the GNTA continues to be committed and take ownership of this visionary strategic plan.

This blog post is from  www.solimarinternational.com/resources-page/blog/itemlist/tag/Destination%20Assessment

StrategyStrategy planning & execution

Your Road Map to a Great Tourism Business Plan

Any great tourism business begins with a great “road map.” This road map serves as your business plan with actionable steps for moving forward with developing the enterprise. There are seven key components to your road map.

  1. Clear Concept- Before you can dive into the road map, the essential first step is to clearly articulate your enterprise concept. What is your enterprise? What do you do? What are you trying to achieve? What impact do you expect your enterprise to generate? Before you move further down the road map, be sure that you put some thought into these questions and can clearly define the concept of your tourism enterprise. Try to condense this concept into a simple one to two sentence pitch that clearly articulates your business concept.
  2. Market Analysis- Your market analysis includes the international, regional, and national tourism statistics and travel trends, the profiles of your target market segments, and a value chain/ industry analysis. Begin by getting an idea of the relevant tourism trends and statistics. What percentage of tourists coming to your destination region, country, or city are country nationals versus international visitors. When is the peak season that tourists come to visit? What are the typical demographics of visitors? Has the number of international tourists to your destination been increasing or decreasing? Addressing these questions will help you to better understand your market before moving forward.

From here, you can develop the profiles of your target market segments. Determine the nationality of your market, their wants and needs, their budget, etc. Think about whether your target traveler is seeking adventure and physical challenges, luxury and relaxation, or service and learning opportunities. Additionally, you will need to analyze the existing tourism industry in your destination. Especially if your enterprise will work with intermediaries; investigate the existence, success, and business models of tour operators, travel agents, and hotels; as they relative to your business concept to market or sell tourism products.

  1. Sales and Marketing Strategy- At this stage of your road map, it is important to determine strategic positioning in terms of the pricing, placement, and promotion strategies of your business. There are numerous factors, both short and long-term to consider for pricing including the value provided compared to that of competitors, the price the market is willing to pay, the revenue needed to enable the business to reach its financial goals, and profit maximization. Your placement, or distribution, may be conducted either through direct or indirect sales. Your promotion strategy will describe the sales and marketing techniques used to reach your target market and should include online and social media marketing.
  2. Competitive Analysis-Complete a summary of competing businesses and products, and determine your competitive advantage. Begin by defining your business competition- the people and businesses that offer similar products and services and seek the same markets. Research these competitors and assess their products or services on a number of factors, such as pricing, product quality, and customer service. Porter’s Five Forces Analysis is a useful tool to use for a through investigation of your competition. By assessing your business competition against your proposed enterprise, you will gain a better understanding of where your business stands and how best to leverage your strengths against your competition’s weaknesses. To determine your competitive advantage, simply outline the major advantages that your enterprise holds over the competition.
  3. Operations and Training Plan-Consider your business structure and the key personnel and training needs that will be required to support it, while also keeping in mind any legal considerations. Will your enterprise be a private company, a partnership, a limited liability corporation (LLC), a cooperative, a non-profit organization, or an association? There are pluses and minuses to each, and it is extremely important to think carefully to determine the best structure for your enterprise. Once the structure is determined, consider the number of employees needed and the roles and responsibilities of each. Consider the hierarchy of employees in your business and how profits will be shared.  Finally, the legal environment is key to consider; think about potential requirements like business registration, employee/membership agreements, permits, and insurance coverage.
  4. Community and Conservation Support- Consider sustainable tourism as a cornerstone to your business plan. Sustainable tourism has the potential to not only mitigate potentially harmful impacts of visitation to a site, but it can also support conservation of the resources upon which it depends. At Solimar, we employ a market-based approach that links jobs and revenue generated by sustainable tourism to support conservation of the resources upon which the tourism depends. To develop a sustainability plan, begin by assessing the conservation threats related to your tourism enterprise. Once these threats have been assessed, you can choose tourism conservation strategies that address those threats, such as an environmental education program or a trail monitoring and research program. Lastly, be sure to budget for the implementation of your sustainability plan, including salaries, equipment, materials, and trainings.
  5. Key Milestones and Workplan- Lastly, now that your business plan has been fully considered, you can create a timeline of the major activities related to the establishment of your enterprise and its tour products and services. Create a comprehensive list of the milestones to be completed for the successful establishment of your business and determine the order in which they shall be addressed. With each milestone completed, you are one step closer to being the proud founder of a great tourism business!

This blog post is from www.solimarinternational.com/resources-page/blog/item/163-your-road-map-to-a-great-tourism-business-plan

 

StrategySustainability

Clustering benefits for sustainability

Cluster based destinations may also have many benefits for sustainability. First, adequate cluster development planning makes it also easier to prevent the tourist flows from overflowing the carrying capacity of the environmentally fragile areas, or having negative impacts on the residents’ lives. The cluster based development plans assess the carrying capacity of all areas to avoid congestion and protect the environmentally fragile points. Then, as long as possible, the Plans should locate the attractions in a way that spreads out the visitors’ flows within the cluster, through controlled itineraries where the flow dimension is monitored and may be constrained. So long as the flows are predictable, it is also easier for the transport and other service operators to offer the adequate services that the tourists need.

Regarding environment sustainability, so long as this is not homogeneous throughout the destination territory, dividing it into clusters is necessary as a part of the process of identification of the critical issues to be managed to ensure sustainability, as these issues are to be different in each destination cluster. Therefore, clustering is a key strategy to manage the destination’s sustainability.

Furthermore, the concentration of activities in specific areas fosters a more efficient development of infrastructures for accessibility (roads, railways, airports, etc.), reducing the negative impacts in the environment to the minimum possible. This also makes the tourism development more cost-efficient for the government, and in some cases, this cost-efficiency affects directly or indirectly the local operators and the visitors.

Cluster based destinations are also more likely to be targeted for research purposes and are easy to study, so long as  they are clearly defined areas. This facilitates gaining knowledge about the key issues that affect the destination’s sustainability. Further, as a part of the cluster infrastructure, it is quite likely that the cluster attracts educational centers, and these attract researchers at the same time, so a virtuous circle is developed in this regard.

Finally, so long as the resources are taken care of, and the activity concentration reinforces competitiveness, this also enhances the economic viability of the tourism development over the long term, ensuring the economic sustainability of the destination.

Do you think of other clustering benefits for sustainability?

StrategyStrategy planning & execution

Clustering benefits for profitability and growth

The concentration of many attractions and related services within an area, specialized in a certain type of activities is likely to attract other operators dealing with this type of activity, as this is where their potential clients go and so as to profit from the existing tourism flows and necessary services available in that area. This saves them many marketing costs, and also results in a much lower risk investment. Therefore, consolidated and competitive clusters are more likely to attract investors.

Further, as it happens in all industries’ clusters, business’ concentration reduces trading costs, thus enhancing profitability. As in all types of clusters, there are also common infrastructures and key resources, which shared among many operators, reduces its cost per operator, through creating economies of scale.

Moreover, concentration helps to boost cooperation, and by joining efforts, partners not only accelerate innovation and develop economies of scale by sharing strategic resources, but also cooperate in lobbying to gain negotiation power against common suppliers and clients, as well as to counter or neutralize other competitive forces that shape the long term industry’s profitability. The Whitepaper “The 5 Competitive forces and business strategy” depicts how these 5 forces shape the long term profitability in the tourism industry.

In many cases, companies in a specialized cluster have a better access to skilled employees and specialized suppliers, also located within the cluster influence area. Institutions or Universities can be used mutually and capital expenditures in regional marketing, infrastructure or education programs can be employed and shared together (Müller and Lanz 1998). Finally, cluster based tourism attractions’ concentration is also beneficial to profitability as long as it contributes to extending the average tourist length of stay.

Beyond profitability, consolidated clusters are also likely to foster more new business creation. First, a concentrated clients’ base lowers the risks for new suppliers to settle in, and as a result of the cluster based boosted innovation, also more spin-offs and start-ups are likely to be created. Further, financial institutions have a good knowledge about the industry, and so they are more likely to provide financial support to new ventures.

Do you think of other clustering benefits for profitability and growth?

StrategyStrategy planning & execution

Clustering benefits for competitiveness

The cluster structuring and development in a destination offers four main types of benefits: enhancing competitiveness, boosting profitability and growth, ensuring sustainability and increasing marketing effectiveness.

As the Competitiveness Planning 3.0 Whitepaper explains in detail, destination competitiveness is based on the relation between value offered to the visitors and efforts demanded, considering experiences, feelings, service quality, and positive impacts of tourism development in the destination as the sources of value; and discomforts, risks, price and negative impacts of the tourism development in the destination as the sources of efforts demanded, or factors diminishing value.

Among all these key factors that determine the destination’s competitiveness, the tourist experience is probably the most important. In this regard, having a higher concentration of experiences –related to the same motivational profile- available within a short distance (not needing to change accommodation in many cases, nor consuming much time in transfers) clearly optimizes the whole destination experience. Cluster development also entails an increasing variety of experiences available, beyond the experience efficiency due to the reduced distances within the cluster.

A good cluster planning should consider a strategy to prevent congestion issues by spreading the tourism flows right from the conception of the cluster layout. This may be achieved by creating many itineraries throughout the cluster to diversify the visitor’s flows –avoiding “backbone itineraries” which tend to concentrate the flows-, and preventing bottlenecks.

Furthermore, by creating themed itineraries and charming transportation systems which may eventually become iconic experiences themselves, not only are the tourist flows spread out but also the experience is enhanced. Charming transportation systems may be traditional transportation means –gondolas, tramways, etc.- made tourist friendly in terms of comfort, or just innovative transport means which are a new experience for the visitors.

Business concentration makes it also more feasible to invest in key resources, which eventually influence positively the cluster’s competitiveness. This may be the case of educational facilities, R&D centers, and cross-destination infrastructures related to accessibility, environmental management & protection, etc.

Do you think of other clustering benefits for the destination competitiveness?

Strategy

The origins of tourism clusters

As Porter says, “the function of a cluster is to create a forum for a growth oriented dialogue between key regional stakeholders”. However, as explained by The Cluster Competitiveness Group, “Clusters typically do not develop as a group of firms which join to pursue a common purpose or goal. Clusters exist, they have their own development and dynamic which can be influenced by private and public activities, but it is very difficult to purposefully construct them”. In the tourism industry, however, the dynamics are sometimes different than in other industries, due to its several particularities.

In this regard, the most typical origins of tourism cluster development are:

Local demand: a spatial concentration of competing businesses facilitates the customers purchasing decision making, allowing them to compare easily between several suppliers. In the case of tourism this happens very often for the shopping clusters. Local demand may also apply to different cases where the cluster is mainly developed by one operator, such as the Theme Parks in the outskirts of large metropolitan areas.

Related industries or related clusters: either for taking advantage of the customer flows or for leveraging specific resources, some industries develop in the same location where others are already developed due to the potential synergies between them, which eventually become a key competitive advantage. Such is the case of the Wellness cluster in the Tirol area (Austria), taking advantage of the ski tourists in the most competitive ski cluster in Europe. Other cases are the development of Golf clusters in Sun & beach destinations with little or no local demand for Golf, such as Spain and Portugal; or the development of Theme Parks in mature destinations.

Exploitation of new special interest demand: regardless of the geographical origin of the demand, the reasons for traveling have been increasing also due to new market segments related to interest in specific cultural or natural resources, for instance. The practice of sports related to natural resources such as mountains or underwater natural heritage has boosted the development of tourism in many places where there were neither related industries nor substantial local demand for these activities. The same applies to cultural tourism related to archeological sites and other types of cultural heritage.

When defining the limits of a cluster, we may consider two different criteria:

  • Cluster boundaries are defined by the linkages and complementarities across industries and institutions which are important in market competition.
  • Cluster boundaries are determined by the physical characteristics of the territory, regardless of its exploitation for tourism development.

The first corresponds to generic business cluster boundary definition, whereas the second is more closely related to tourism clusters. However, as explained in upcoming sections of this Whitepaper, some tourism clusters may correspond rather to the first boundary definition.

Do you think of other criteria to define the limits of a tourism cluster?

StrategyStrategy planning & executionSustainabilityTourism marketingTourism trends

A theoretical approach to cluster development

As introduced in the first point, tourism clusters are created to leverage the unique resources of a location or in some cases to gather artificial resources in the same location. In both cases, they improve the value of the location to end up making the location a key strategic factor.

To make a cluster competitive there are many key success factors that should be considered by the cluster members:

  • Transport infrastructure within, and to access the cluster from the target markets
  • Solidarity and cooperation spirit among players
  • Cooperation between the Government and the private players
  • Creating a welcoming atmosphere to attract international talent
  • Foresee space for attracting new businesses and expanding the cluster

A very specific key success factor is the existence of a governance structure to promote collaboration and joint projects, fostering innovation and promoting the cluster internationally. This governance body should be also responsible for:

  • Attracting new businesses
  • Performance monitoring
  • Intelligence research
  • Identifying needs for improvement and training
  • Representing the cluster players internationally
  • Organizing networking events and conferences
  • Coordinating players to design and implement the cluster development strategy

As mentioned before, there may be many types of players within a cluster, and so the types of cooperation between them may also be different. There are at least two types of cooperation:

  • Value chain cooperation: between players from different sections of the value chain, to gain efficiency or to add new value.
  • Coopetition: competitors sharing resources and costs that are not afordable for each one alone.

Research has shown that tourism development is a venue in which cooperation is often more important than competition (Inman et al. 1998). A cluster based development should try to build the value chain within each cluster in the region. A cluster strategy places all public and private stakeholders in the position of being producers and suppliers to one another, and seeks for constructive ways to define and carry out mutually beneficial action. The value chain is central to the tourism cluster concept, as it demonstrates how tourism can generate benefits to the economy beyond the tourism sector through linked industries (Gollub et al. 2002).

Do you think of other key success factors to make a cluster competitive?

StrategyStrategy planning & executionSustainabilityTourism trends

What is a cluster and why are they created?

One of the key strategies to develop in any Tourism Development Plan consists of structuring the territory in different areas according to the kinds of activities to be carried out in each one. The clustering strategy is essential for the tourism development regardless of the dimension of the territory: clusters exist within countries, regions and even towns.

A cluster may be defined as a concentration of interconnected businesses and institutions in a limited geographical area. In most cases, such businesses and institutions belong to the same sector; but, as we will see in some case studies, sometimes there are new business sectors that flourish in a cluster to take advantage of assets related to other sectors in the cluster.

It may also be defined as an area characterised by a set of distinctive tourism assets which all together create a unique value system capable of attracting tourists and competing with other destinations. Many industry players settle down in the same location to cooperate in the search for synergies that improve their competitiveness:

  • Need for specific infrastructures to be leveraged by many industry players
  • Need for collaboration between industry players to create economies of scale and scope
  • Cooperation in joint marketing

Clusters also arise because they help businesses increase their productivity by sharing many strategic resources, diminishing trading costs between suppliers and clients, and fostering innovation thanks to proximity of a sector’s stakeholders. In the case of tourism destinations, clusters are the result of a concentration of operators exploiting a cultural or natural resource, or a concentration of operators developing artificial and complementary attractions.

Clusters are areas that can be considered as being internally homogeneous with specific traits that differentiate them from others. The goal of the clustering strategy is to structure the location of all tourism activities in accordance with the types of experiences and feelings they offer or the characteristics of the physical environment, and also to define a clear identity for every cluster and communicate it clearly to the visitors.

As Michael Porter says “Clusters are not unique, they are extremely typical –and therein lies the paradox: the enduring competitive advantages in a global economy lie increasingly in local settings which distant rivals cannot compensate. In a cluster, interconnected companies, firms in related industries and associated institutions both compete and cooperate”.

The term cluster may apply to many different destination dimensions: at a national, regional or local level. We may use clusters to distinguish several geographical areas within a country, each of which is specialized in a different type of experience, but also within each of these clusters there may be –and usually there are- sub-clusters according to smaller geographical areas with specific characteristics that are different from the rest, so long as these characteristics are relevant to be leveraged for a distinct tourism experience. At the lower scale, we distinguish clusters within local destinations, so long as these comprehend different areas providing unique or clearly differentiated atmospheres, resources and experiences.

Do you think of other reasons to explain the creation of clusters?

Marketing 3.0StrategyStrategy planning & execution

Destination models’ brand values related variables

Character and style harmony: many destinations pay special attention to the architectural style and urban aesthetics to guarantee a harmonic urban landscape. This harmony is very appreciated by most upscale tourists, for it is an important requirement to attract the highest spenders. These destinations take special care of the traditional urban heritage and require new developments to follow the same traditional style in harmony with the most authentic buildings and urban aesthetics. Unfortunately, there are also many destinations that have not taken any care of this issue, allowing new hotels and apartments to be built disregarding the harmony with the traditional style of the destination. This is a missed opportunity to offer an experience with a differentiated value that only destinations with character can provide.

Development & tourist flow constraints: closely correlated to the “character and style harmony”, destinations have to decide the maximum capacity of tourists they are able to sustain, depending on their concern on sustainability and also on the type of tourists they are willing to attract. Upscale tourists are to be more exigent regarding congestion issues that may spoil the experience, and so prefer staying somewhere a bit more exclusive with accommodation capacity constraints. Conversely, destinations with little capacity constraints are more likely to attract middle to low end profile tourists, who are not that much concerned about congestion problems.

Other constraints may be those related to the visitors allowed in the natural or cultural heritage sites, to prevent both congestion issues and to manage tourist flows according to the site’s carrying capacity. This capacity is determined by experts who assess the impact of the tourism activity on the site, and establish a limit of visitors per hour or per day that guarantees the sustainability of the tourism activity in the site.

Accommodation mix: the combination of different types of accommodation services is also a relevant variable to consider. In this point there are two main issues to resolve: first, the mix between hotels and real estate, considering also intermediate formulas. Hotels create jobs and tax revenues, whereas real estate may be an important source of funds to leverage for investments, and also to create loyal tourists. Second, there has to be the decision on the accommodation mix of categories –namely for hotels- according to the types of tourists that the destination intends to attract.

Sustainability management: the control of the tourism activity impact and the protection of the environment and cultural heritage in the development are also a key factor to take into account. Many tourism activities carried out in natural environments require damaging the landscape or threaten its fragility. Therefore the constraints on the tourism development in natural areas and the protection status given to these areas are an essential issue to consider in tourism development planning. In this point, it is necessary to determine the carrying capacity of the natural areas and determine the accommodation capacity accordingly.



Branding: all the aforementioned variables along with the natural and cultural assets of the destination define the destination experiences and determine the attributes and values of the brand. The branding messages contained in all marketing materials and campaigns should go in accordance with them. Branding also refers to the image that the destination conveys as a territory, for it is a political issue of major importance: the destination model is not only to be decided by the local tourism operators, but rather through consensus among all stakeholders.

Would you consider other brand value related variables?

Collaborative business modelsStrategyStrategy planning & executionSustainability

The destination model as a key factor for competitiveness and sustainability

The competitiveness of a tourism destination is not just a matter of tourism operators’ performance. Instead, the potential of a destination for competing in the travel market is determined from the top government policies regarding urban planning, public services, territory planning –protecting natural interest areas-, and tourism development planning, determining tourism related regulations, license policies, investments in facilities and infrastructures and also cross-destination marketing planning and execution.

So long as the tourism activity affects not only the tourism operators, but also the residents’ lives, other business sectors and the image of the territory, it is necessary to elaborate a thorough model attending to the needs and aspirations of all stakeholders. The complexity and challenge of tourism development planning is namely in the need for reaching a balance point, considering all the stakeholders’ interests.

A destination model is to provide answers to three main questions:

  • What can we do to develop tourism in the destination?
  • How can we do it?
  • What vision do we want to strive for?

Finding answers to these questions means choosing among different alternatives related to the tourism to be developed: the development pace, intensity, the limitations to the business growth, etc. Furthermore, a development model works like a guide and reference framework for the activities of both public and private agents, and to articulate cooperation between different public bodies and between public and private ones.

Other advantages and benefits of defining a destination development model are:

  • The territorial structure –cluster definition- of the tourism development is clearly defined.
  • The destination takes advantage of the market opportunities more effectively.
  • The destination’s resources and attractions are leveraged more adequately.
  • Government leaders and local operators have a reference framework to orient their strategy.
  • The need for infrastructures, facilities, financial, technological and human resources are clearly defined according to established goals.
  • Investors have a reference framework that provides them with valuable orientation.
  • Resources are assigned more rationally, effectively and profitably.
  • The tourism management has a reference framework to orient the decision making.
  • The reaction versus certain changes in the market is faster and more effective.

Once the model is defined, if this is brought into practice, there are even more benefits:

  • The destination creates and develops solid and sustainable competitive advantages.
  • The destination positioning and image is stronger.
  • The tourism businesses operating in the destination are more profitable and increase revenue
  • The service quality and tourists’ satisfaction increases.
  • The destination inhabitants perceive the positive impact of the tourism activity more clearly.
  • All stakeholders have more confidence in the future of the destination.

Do you think of other benefits of defining the destination development model?