Tag: Marketing 3.0

Marketing 3.0Tourism marketing

Amplify Your Roar: Leverage Social Media to Market Your Destination

In this generation, social media is more important than ever, especially for tourism marketing. People are spending over four times more time on Facebook than Google – today there are about 1.3 billion people on Facebook. Is Facebook really useful for businesses? Let this number convince you – 52% of businesses have acquired customers through Facebook. That’s a lot of potential for the tourism industry.

Needless to say, social media can be your destination’s magic megaphone. But do you know how to use it well? Here are some questions to ask yourself as you endeavor to amplify your roar.

Are You Connecting With People? No, Really Connecting?

A billboard does not listen. People listen. This is where social media differs from traditional marketing- as you can (and should) be interacting with your audience directly. Ask questions. Make it interactive. Reply to comments.

Another exciting thing about social media marketing is the way in which even one individual’s Likes, Shares, Comments, Tweets, Friends, or Tags are able to increase your visibility, diverting more and more eyes to you.

Are You Developing the Right Content?

60% of the sales process is over before a prospective buyer ever talks to a salesman or begins the process. What does that mean? It means that almost every single visitor will make a majority of their decision through online research before anything else. You want to create content that supports them in that online research phase.

So be sure to evaluate your content. Have you thought about keywords? How is the quality of your images? Are you providing a diverse enough array of multimedia content? What are you offering and are you communicating it in an appealing way? These are important thoughts to take into consideration.

Are You On the Right Platform?

It is also important to know where to roar.  Find out who your target audience is, and where they spend their time in the online world. They could be on Instagram, Twitter, Pinterest, Tumblr, or maybe even all of the above. There is more to social media than Facebook and one of the best ways to amplify your roar is to increase your reach through these different, targeted social media platforms.

Are You Showcasing Personality?

Social media also offers you a unique opportunity to be human. Nobody wants to talk to a salesman who is constantly pitching; they want to build relationships with real people. The same principle applies when it comes to creating brand loyalty, trust and eventually sales. Don’t be afraid to show a little bit of humor and personality in your social media marketing strategy. Be relevant, not robotic. If visitors to your social media site are having fun, they will want to have fun at your actual physical site too.

What Does Your Unique Roar Sound Like?

Every destination, including yours, has something unique to offer. So there’s no need to spend all your time trying to imitate somebody else’s roar.

A destination assessment can go a long way in identifying your hidden gems and how to best conserve them. Many destinations have a diverse array of brilliant tourism products which have been overlooked. You want to be able to spot these with destination assessments and to also tailor social media marketing strategies to showcasing your best colors. Some projects in Rwanda, Namibia and the U.S. Gulf Coast, for example, have been integral in doing that: maximizing an active audience of followers, generating stunning branding content and increasing revenue by presenting destinations at the very peak of their potential.

With unlimited online space, the opportunities to multiply your untapped audience are limitless. Take the right steps with social media and you could have the loudest roar of all.

This blog post is from www.solimarinternational.com/resources-page/blog/itemlist/tag/Destination%20Assessment

Marketing 3.0storytellingTourism marketing

Storytelling: What Makes a Good Story?

Storytelling is the future of digital marketing, plain and simple. If you aren’t on board yet, you are living in the past and each day you are “advertising” your products instead of “storytelling” about your business is another day your competitors are getting ahead of you. But before we jump into some ideas about what makes a good story, let’s look at the evolving digital marketer.

Yesterday’s Digital Marketer

You’ve all met this person. Heck, this terrible stereotype may even be you. But yesterday’s digital marketer is all about checkboxes. They have a list of channels: web, Facebook, Twitter, mobile app. They see these channels are just another mechanism through which to broadcast their message. Even though digital channels include technologies to enable engagement, they are still practicing old school marketing methods. They are still advertising. They focus on trying to sell a product which is like driving through mud: just when the think they have traction (and customers get the messaging), they have to start again (with a new product) or change it up (to keep from getting stale) and before they know it, they are spinning their wheels again in a new puddle. Maybe it’s a perfect strategy to justify a cushy existence.

But as digital marketing (and the customer) continue to evolve, it’s clear that this is a dying approach.

Today’s Digital Marketer (aka, God of Engagement)

These people are still hard to find but when you do, you know it almost immediately. They don’t have checklists. They have numbers that tell them the effectiveness of their efforts, numbers that speak about depth of engagement, metrics that illustrate the impact of their marketing effort. And they aren’t telling customers about their product. They are using different channels to create an emotional connection between customers and their brand so that when they need to launch a new product or change its messaging, it’s not like trying to roll that rock uphill because they’ve already done the REALLY hard work: creating the connection between the customer and what’s really important.

How do they do this? Through storytelling.

What is Storytelling?

We aren’t talking about War and Peace. We are talking about the kinds of stories that businesses are beginning to tell, the kinds of stories that engage with customers and create real, emotional connection, the kinds of stories through which businesses engage with customers as they move through the narrative arc. Look at Coca-Cola’s new website: Coca-Cola Journeys (we will be examining this story in-depth in a future post of this series). Their story is about stories of people using their products, or impacted by Coca-Cola’s brand, or affected by some other aspect of the company. Coca-cola is telling their customers that they are a facilitator, an enabler. They are crafting stories with narration across channels.

Digital storytelling isn’t reading Dr. Seuss to your customers. And although it may be, it’s not necessarily about characters and plots. But it is about a situation in which someone uses the product to cause some result. That’s a narrative arc:

  • Exposition/Set-up. Where the action is going to take place.
  • Rising Action. Characters in the story finding the product and putting it to use to solve a problem.
  • Solving the problem with the product.
  • Falling Action. Mopping up the action. Everything calming down.
  • The result of the climax. What happened to the characters now that they solved the problem using the product?

It has been written in other posts that Storytelling is critical to digital marketers as a crucial method to create differentiation in an increasingly competitive global, digital market.

So What Makes Good Storytelling?

First, this isn’t a critique on narrative conventions or stage directions. The points below are salient action items for today’s digital marketer to ensure a visceral, emotional connection between customer and company. Second, there’s probably a lot of discussion to be had about this list. We may have left off items that seem obvious (or about which you believe strongly). We may have included items that you think are frivolous. Regardless, let’s just agree that there is a general list and agree-to-disagree that ours might not be the gospel.

  • Narrative arc. In order to create emotional connection, the story has to have an arc. That arc could be split across channels. It could be split across campaigns. Doesn’t matter. But research is showing that the brain responds chemically (i.e., generates emotional connection) when the story follows a traditional arc.
  • About company, not product. It is far more effective (long-term) for stories to somehow relate the company position and its ethos rather than focus on a product. Not only does this differentiate (customers are becoming increasingly jaded to product-level messaging) but it also allows products to be interchanged without compromising the emotional connection made between customer and company.
  • Multi-channel (with purpose). Good stories cross channels. They make use of web, mobile, social, and others. But these stories aren’t just repeated across channels. The story is tailored and tweaked to take advantage of the channel, both from a technology and engagement perspective. Customers in different channels have different expectations of the story/content. Good stories appeal to and acknowledge that.
  • Emotional. Flat stories suck. These are stories that just seem to “go through the motions.” Really good stories pull heart strings, make us laugh, make the reader rise to action. This is in addition to the emotional connection that the reader may make with “actors” (i.e., characters, events, places, etc.) within the story. It magnifies that connection.
  • Rich media. Let’s face it, people don’t like to read a lot of text. If you mistake storytelling with writing, you will be sorely disappointed. Good stories in the digital world leverage all sorts of different media type: videos, audio, slideshows, images, graphics. Not only does rich media promote interaction, it creates variety. It creates that emotional engagement on a variety of different levels using several different senses.
  • Engagement. All good digital stories provide for engagement. This may be simply for customers to share with other customers (you might be surprised about the power of simply enabling customers to talk about how they feel about your story) and it may be a planned event. Regardless, successful stories will look for multiple opportunities to engage directly with customers as they form these emotional connections with the story. And if done right, this will strengthen the bond between customer and company (a company that “cares” to hear what its customers have to say).
  • Mechanics. You may take it for granted, but your users don’t: performance matters. Research in web and video engagement point to customers abandoning your story when it’s slow or under performing. And being able to reach everywhere your customers might be is of equal importance. The last thing you want to do is have a weak story in one region (because only one channel is available) where a competitor might not.

Again, this is not an exhaustive list. But it’s a good starting point for evaluating whether or not a digital story is successful. Next up we will take a look at Coca-Cola against these bullets as an example of a well-executed digital story.

You can read more about Storytelling in the Whitepaper “Marketing destinations through storytelling” in this weblog.

This blog post is from: www.rethinkeverythingblog.com/2017/10/11/storytelling-101-what-makes-a-good-story/

Marketing 3.0Tourism marketingTourism trends

How Has Digital Changed Destination Touchpoints?

The rules of marketing have definitely changed. In this new digital environment, a weak and inadequate brand will quickly be exposed. The potency and breadth of new digital platforms are compelling DMOs to engage in activities that have greater relevance, integration, targeting accuracy, speed, and responsiveness. It’s now a two-way encounter, no longer totally controlled by the destination and its partners.

More Accessible Touchpoints

Touchpoints are the most critical moments where the customer comes in contact with the place and where its brand reputation can be enhanced or devalued. The Digital Age is opening an even greater range of opportunities to connect with customers before, during and after their visit.

Mobile devices have provided consumers with the 24/7 ability to source information (web), navigate (GPS), be entertained and learn (video), communicate (text), compare (Yelp), meet (Foursquare), brag (Facebook and Instagram) and review (TripAdvisor) while wandering through a museum, walking a forest trail or driving an historic route. Not to mention the power to enhance the interpretation, storytelling and ability to bring a place to life through place-based solutions. They are dramatically changing the way that visitors interact with places.

There are extensive opportunities for destinations to bring their brand to life and deliver value and amazing visitor experiences. For DMOs the challenge is to orchestrate and influence encounters to be as close as possible to the brand vision at every critical touchpoint. This coverage can now be integrated through traditional and digital platforms. While touchpoints may vary for each customer, they may be in the form of a magazine ad, tradeshow, booking, website, tweet, kiosk, smartphone apps, map, street sign, tour guide or myriad other encounters.

A location that doesn’t optimize the use of these assets and fails to present itself as interactive, engaging and experiential won’t develop a meaningful brand or sustainable destination. Those destinations that will excel are clearly differentiated, innovative, and connect and inspire customers across its most critical touchpoints.

An Era of Opportunity

Rather than be threatened by these new rules and digital tools, DMOs should embrace them by fostering a city-wide culture of innovation, adaptation and collaboration. Despite these new assets and changes to consumer behavior and interaction, the basic principles of branding haven’t changed. To thrive and survive DMOs must learn new skills and be more adaptive in conveying their destination’s distinctiveness and benefits across myriad media, platforms and touchpoints that destination managers could not have accessed a decade ago. And to achieve this they must be guided less by politics and appeasement, and more by collaboration, product development, and true customer focus.

This post is from http://citybranding.typepad.com/city-branding/page/2/

Co-creationCollaborative cultureCulture changeInnovative cultureOpen innovation

Shared decisions feel better

 “The social networks potential to turn every citizen into an agent for the improvement of the community is huge” says Alfons Cornella –Spanish Innovation leader- in his book “The solution starts by CO”.

During the last few years it has become fashionable that destinations outsource part of their promotion activities to visitors and local community members. In what could be called co-creation processes, many destination management and promotion bodies have decided to celebrate public elections to select their logos and slogans. In this election there is first a period to receive proposals, and at the end of this period the public election takes place.

At first it may sound very open and transparent. So long as both the logo and the slogan are to become key elements of the destination image, it is good that everybody can express their opinion about it. However, this system may entail some risks. Those who vote probably choose their vote according to purely esthetic criteria, without considering aspects related with the value promise of the destination, or its desired positioning, the targets, etc. As a result of these processes there have been some bad experiences.

The main issue is that the chosen logo and/or slogan should be in accordance with the destination strategy, which is usually defined in a Strategy Plan according to the destination leaders’ criteria. It is therefore necessary to introduce a filtering phase either before or after the public election, to discard all those logos and slogans that do not match with the destination strategy.

In Spain there has been mainly one experience of this kind, in the Basque Country, driven by the Bilbao City Council and the Bizkaia Province Government. These two institutions had been collaborating for a long time, up to the point that they shared a stand in the FITUR Tourism Fair under the brand BI2. In this way, they wanted to leverage the power of the Bilbao brand to favor also the rest of the Province, so long as the Bizkaia brand is far behind in terms of awareness, despite the worthy resources it has. Bilbao, in turn, has experienced a transformation thanks to the Guggenheim effect and the public-private collaboration, which has led to a sustained visitors’ growth in the city.

Deepening in this collaboration line, they have launched a contest to select their new common logo and slogan. In this case, they opened a public contest for professionals under a detailed briefing. As a result of this idea contest, they received up to 84 proposals from 7 different countries. They were all exposed to the public, though the first selection process was carried out by a commission of experts to present 10 final proposals to be voted for by the public. To facilitate participation, they have installed 6 voting points to let locals vote for their favourite choice.

However, the citizens’ votes will count for only 20% of the final decision. The rest will be responsibility of the experts committee led by Garry White, President of the European Cities Marketing Association.

What do you thing about letting the locals vote for strategic decisions of high symbolic value?

This blogpost is from  http://www.visionesdelturismo.es/las-decisiones-compartidas-saben-mejor/

Co-creationCollaborative business modelsCollaborative cultureInnovative cultureMarketing 3.0

Making collaboration efficient when face to face is not possible

As it has been explained in many posts, content and product co-creation is in the core of Marketing 3.0, though to leverage a significant share of the stakeholders’ creativity potential it is necessary to think of virtual co-creation methods, to complement co-creation workshops and other face to face activities. However, beyond the technological tools such as video-conference, it is necessary to know how to manage virtual co-creation. This article provides many clues to do so successfully.

Started as a simple experiment in social media, in 2010 composer and conductor Eric Whitacre called out to his online fans to record themselves singing “Sleep” by the British choir Polyphony and upload the result. Impressed by the result, he decided to push the concept to the next level by recording himself conducting ‘Lux Aurumque’, then asking fans to sing along to that. This way, the first Virtual Choir was created. The results of that experiment quickly became viral. Now with more than fifteen million views, the Virtual Choir phenomenon has reached all corners of the world, inspiring more and more singers to join each year.

Beyond its beauty and emotional impact, Virtual Choir also fascinated because its implications regarding the potential new uses for new communication technologies and as one of the first virtual experiences turned into something real. The Virtual Choir can also be considered as an important remainder for how businesses might overcome the challenges of virtuality to benefit from innovative and more efficient business processes, customer relationships or forms of production, from co-innovation and co-production to crowdsourcing, crowdfunding or open source.

Not even leaving the limits of a corporation or a company, working remotely can offer operational flexibility, happier employees and lower costs, but to team up virtually with colleagues and coworkers can also pose important challenges. As we know, truly efficient collaboration presents no few difficulties. Virtual collaboration raises even more added complications that require even more care. But as the concept of the extended enterprise becomes more common and most professionals can do their jobs from anywhere, the more critical becomes to get virtual teams right. But how?

Getting right four pillars for virtual collaboration

The answer is not easy. Different studies carried out during the last decade seem to conclude that most of virtual groups fail to satisfy the expectations of companies and their clients. In another study conducted by Deloitte some years ago most of CEO’s and other managers interviewed still considered face-to-face interaction much more productive that virtual communication, and nearly half of them admitted ignorance and confusion about collaboration technologies and their potential.

But some other experts consider is all about how these teams are managed. An Aon Consulting report found that dispersed teams, when run accordingly to this condition, could outperform those sharing the same office space (recording up to 43% higher efficiency). A study of 80 global software teams conducted by BCG and WHU-Otto Beisheim School of Management concluded that virtual teams can improve employee productivity when they are properly managed.

But, what do they mean by “properly managed” or “run accordingly to its virtual condition”? According to Keith Ferrazzi and based on his research and experience helping all sort of organizations as customers of his consulting firm, there are four critical elements to get right: right teams, right leadership, right technology and right touch points.

Size is important (the smaller, the better)

We have recently wrote in this blog about how important is to consider people mindset and attitude for working collaboratively beyond their professional knowledge and other skills. Ferrazzi agrees people should first of all be specially suited to work in virtual teams, backing for instance profiles with good communication skills or high emotional intelligence. But it is also equally important to put them into groups of the right size and implementing and clearly establishing and communicating the right roles for each one.

As we know, smaller groups facilitate collaboration. In the case of virtual teams, size should be even smaller than when face to face interaction is the norm (some studies suggest teams of 5-6 people and no more than 10 in any case). Team members reduce effort when they feel less responsible for output, but this fact can equally be applied to non-virtual teams. Collaboration between people not sharing a physical space should pay special attention to ensure inclusive communication, a quality harder to achieve the bigger the virtual group is.

Good leadership amplified

Managers can maximize the productivity of virtual teams also by developing the right leadership. Again, this is a quality to apply to every teamwork, no matter if virtual or not. But right leadership must be amplified in virtual ones. A study of different engineering groups concluded that the virtual teams that performed best were those with managers with previous experience in leading such work groups.

Encouraging open dialogue, for instance, is particularly important in these cases. Leaders of dispersed groups in particular must push members to be frank with one another as the problems associated with lack of affinity are more common and severe for virtual teams. For similar reasons, virtual collaboration requires an extra effort fostering trust among co-workers. Ferrazzi mentions the case of a fully virtual organization that encourage new hires to offer video tours of their work spaces, allowing colleagues to mentally picturing their surroundings in later communications. Managers also push their team members to share personal news as a way to compensate the lack of the common chat about their lives that usually takes place sooner or later when a physical office is shared.

Special care is also recommended about clarifying goals and guidelines and establishing a common purpose or vision (explaining and repeating often the reason of working together and the benefits that will result of that). Particularly vital in the case of virtual teams are guidelines about interaction between members. For instance, multitasking on conference calls should be banned, as full attention is needed when using communication technologies that are not able to fully replace the subtle signals of personal interaction beyond a voice.

Not leaving it all to virtuality

Fostering touch points is also critical. Virtual teams should come together as often as possible. To do so, some specific stages of the working process are more important than others. Kickoff should be one of these for sure, using a first face to face meeting to star working in some of the key points mentioned (clarifying team goals or encouraging trust, for instance). If any proper project management establishes milestones, when dealing with virtual team leaders can leverage them to get people together for celebrating achievement of short-term goals or cracking problems.

And last but not least, efficient virtual collaboration also depends on using the right technology. According to Ferrazzi, even top-notch virtual teams can fail due to poor technology. In this case, recommendations are not so much about detailed features as about fulfilling general needs especially critical in the case virtual interactions. For instance, facilitating automatic transcriptions or records with a simple click, making easy to search for this content in a database or, while using the right tool for each mission, favor technologies that better help to reproduce face to face interaction (videoconferencing instead of a phone call, for example).

This post is from http://www.co-society.com/making-collaboration-efficient-face-face-possible/

Business trendsCo-creationCollaborative cultureInnovationInnovative culture

Teaming up with customers & fans to co-innovate

As explained many times in this blog, engaging customers and turning them into fans, contributors and brand ambassadors is one of the key success factors of destinations 3.0. One recent case within the entertainment sector showcases how co-innovation with fans can lead to fruitful results.

Even if the concept of costumer centric business is still often more of a marketing trick or organizational aspiration than a reality, increasing competition is making brands truly getting closer to customers. Some others are even going further: they are putting them at the heart of business decision-making.

When it comes to innovation they’re even asking them for help with the process, not just simply using them to provide insight. Consumer-led creativity does exist. Consumers are a huge and largely untapped source of creativity and innovation. Customers are already creating value and solving problems without any encouragement from commercial organizations. Why not trying to tap into it?

Co-creation workshops can help businesses pool ideas from participants and turn these insights into tangible prototypes that can be evaluated in real time. We could recently prove it once more when asked by F.C. Barcelona to lead its first co-creation workshop with members of the football club in order to work together in a process of proposals and ideas. Using the context of the recent Mobile World Congress, fifty F.C. Barcelona supporters between 18 and 40 years gathered in a workshop named ‘Smart & Mobile Connection Future’ to propose ideas linked to technological applications that could facilitate the living and sensing of everything the sport club is offering to its members, supporters and fans in the stadium and sports events.

After a few speeches introducing the vision, mission and methodology of the workshop by some innovation experts, the supporters were divided into small groups to encourage their participation, which resulted in a great deal of ideas related to the use of new technologies in the Stadium and the sporting events. Contributions and needs identified were numerous. For instance, it was proposed to make possible to watch game replays on the phone or tablet at the Camp Nou stadium itself in real time; and apps to order sandwiches and drinks from seats during the game or to access to information about public transport and traffic around the stadium. Some other proposals pointed to be able to carry a digital version club’s member card in smartphones that could also be used for mobile payments at shops and restaurants linked with F.C. Barcelona.

Co-creation workshop ‘Smart & Mobile Connection Future’ is part of a transversal innovation program started late last year with the aim to identify problems and opportunities for the organization and resolve them through new projects or ways of working. Some other workshops like this are coming soon and will be related to other areas of the club.

This article is from www.co-society.com/teaming-customers-co-innovate-even-better-fans-youre-lucky

Marketing 3.0Storytelling training & case studiesTourism marketing

Storytelling marketing for the Santiago Way’s pilgrimage

One of the worldwide famous life-changing experience destination is the Santiago Way, a pilgrimage route that revived two decades ago from the middle age. It was first developed through the local Government’s investment in hospitality facilities and promotion, and from then on through word of mouth and high-profile storytelling, including many films.

Even if the experience concept is apparently simple –mostly considering that most pilgrims do not have religious motivations-, it turns to be a memorable social experience where you meet people from all walks of life, from all nationalities and ages, but in all cases everybody has an open mind and a noble heart, unlike most of us are used to in our daily lives. Unlike most other holiday concepts, this one is essentially a social experience which is totally flexible in the way that you can start and finish when and where you prefer to, and you can improvise your journey every day.

The intense conviviality along the whole journey when walking and once arrived in the destination hostel sets the stage for multiple kinds of stories about friendship, self-discovery and awareness, transferring wisdom, and love, among many others that you can imagine.

Such a life-changing experience scenario has inspired many celebrities in writing books and making films. Such is the case of Paulo Coelho –Brazilian bestseller author- with his book “El Peregrino de Compostela”, which brought a considerable flow of Brazilian pilgrims; or Hape Kerkeling –German Showman- with his book and film “I’m off then” which also brought large flows of German visitors. Other cases are Shirley Maclaine with her book “The Way” or Charlie Sheen in a film with the same name. This is a benchmark case study to illustrate how life-changing experiences inspire stories up to high-profile storytelling.

Nowadays, the local DMO do not need to invest in promotion anymore. The storytelling machine works itself and The Way has revived many areas which were literally abandoned. Beyond the main route, where all these media stories take place, many other Santiago Ways have been developed taking advantage of The Way’s enthusiasts boom, thus reviving the other historical pilgrimage routes to Santiago de Compostela coming from different points of the Iberian Peninsula.

Do you know of other similar cases?

Co-creationCollaborative business modelsInnovationMarketing 3.0Open innovation

Product development through co-creation

Beyond customization right before or during the experience, co-creation may take place in many different ways:

  • Co-creation workshops, organized as a creative and educational activity open to all stakeholders, which in turn may provide valuable ideas to develop products.
  • Product development contests, organized to promote contribution to the open innovation system providing elaborated ideas on how to develop new life-changing experiences.
  • Ideation bank contributions, permanently accessible as a section of the open innovation system, where innovation needs are posted, and solutions are submitted and voted.
  • Product Manager’s creation based on inputs from creative reviews and new stories, permanently inspiring and nurturing the marketers’ creativity.
  • Local service supplier creation based on own creativity, inputs from reviews and stories, and the technical support of the Product Manager.

The Product co-creation workshops play a critical role as both educational and productive events. There, Product Managers explain the product development process and the key success factors for creating life-changing experiences according to the destination’s mission. The workshops educate the attendants in the art of ideation and team working to generate and refine ideas leveraging all group members’ creativity.

Attendance should be mandatory for local DMC like the micro-entrepreneurs from the base of the pyramid, but also the participation of all other community stakeholders should be encouraged. Other interesting targets could be school students as part of their education, members of mission driven organizations such as NGO, etc.

Do you think of other ways to develop products through co-creation?

StrategyStrategy planning & executionSustainability

Developing destination’s spiritual value

The programs or actions to neutralize or reduce the negative impacts of the tourism activity are nearly or exactly the same ones that eventually manage to create positive impacts. In most cases, it is just a matter of the initial state of the destination and the intensity and ambition of the program what makes the difference between neutralizing or reducing negative impacts, and creating positive ones. Such impacts may correspond to three different spheres of influence: social, economic and environmental impacts. The main factors that create spiritual value in a destination are the following:

  • Fostering entrepreneurship at the base of the pyramid and training the poorer layers of the local community to integrate in the labor market not only reduces poverty but also enhances social cohesion, and creates a spirit of social harmony as a result of the integration of these groups of people in the community. This is very likely to be perceived by the visitors and appreciated by their human spirit.
  • Encouraging community members to contribute through the open innovation system in creating stories, co-creating products and bringing in ideas to enhance competitiveness is also a powerful social impact generator. Leveraging people’s talents, rewarding and giving them recognition for their contribution makes them feel like valuable protagonists within the tourism industry system, and helps them grow personally, eventually shifting their attitude towards tourists, being more hospitable and helping them have a memorable experience.
  • Preserving the natural environment and fostering the growth of the local endemic species helps the destination boost its uniqueness and character. Creating green spaces both in the public and private areas with typically local trees, plants and flowers conveys a spirit of healthy environment. Furthermore, in the cases where there are typically local animal species, it is also good to make them be part of the destination experience. Both lush animal and vegetable life provide positive impacts to the visitors’ human spirit.
  • Enhancing the attractiveness of the destination also makes it a pleasant living place for its inhabitants. Improving cleanliness, heritage restoration, developing cultural entertainment –events, museums, etc.-, creating green spaces, clearing pollution, making the urban areas more human friendly, harmonizing urban aesthetics and enhancing other aspects of the landscape are appealing to all community stakeholders.
  • Boosting economic development and wealth creation is one of the main goals of tourism development. The tourism 3.0 approach intends to spread the generation of wealth among all types of stakeholders. A clear indicator of success is therefore the increase of disposable income throughout all layers of society. The extent to which the destination collaborative model expands is one of the main key success factors to make it happen.

The key idea behind the creation of spiritual value is the balanced development and shared growth, considering tourism businesses, employees and micro-entrepreneurs, local inhabitants not related to the tourism activity, non-tourism businesses, and the cultural and natural heritage. Tourism development should be a win-win activity for all elements that are part of the destination life to make it appealing to the visitors’ human spirit.

Do you think of other factors which contribute to create spiritual value?

Co-creationMarketing 3.0StrategyTourism marketingTourism trends

Cross-destination competitiveness programs: enhancing marketing

Route partnering with neighbor destinations. Regardless of whether nearby destinations are within the same country or not, for some tourism sectors such as International touring or Fly & drive, marketing an attractive route encompassing a selection of interesting destinations is likely to be far more efficient and effective than marketing these destinations independently. Further, it makes the product far more competitive.

This partnership may be also attractive for some types of Special Interest travel, especially in the case of the long haul markets, whose tourists are more likely to do long routes once they land at the destination. The sum of Special interest attractions of the same kind within a route makes it an attractive product to justify a trip for many of these long-haul travelers. This is also an opportunity to develop new products for many destinations in the same area, making it a win-win development project.

Therefore it is convenient to explore partnership agreements with neighbor destinations which are suitable for adding value to the final product, so as to share marketing costs while creating a more attractive product. Even if many tour operators create these routes themselves, the marketing activities not only directed to tour operators (fam-trips, workshops, etc.), but also to the final client, are likely to increase the results of the marketing efforts.

New flight connections. A key program to develop is connecting the destination with all target markets, by all possible means, but mostly focusing on flight connections. Accessibility is a key factor for competitiveness, and so enhancing the capacity and the competition among transport operators benefits also the destination competitiveness.

Attracting new flight connections is not at all an easy challenge. First, and most importantly, the destination has to arouse sufficient demand to make the airline operator identify a business opportunity. To do so –whenever the destination is also an outbound market for the other- it is convenient to join efforts with the other destination’s DMO and Government in order to boost demand to clearly creating a profitable opportunity.

The Government and DMO should share with the airline operator the Tourism development plan, to build confidence and make them envision the business growth they can take advantage of, highlighting the marketing activities planned for their market. It is important to highlight that the intervention of the Government executives is very recommended, even in the cases when it is not strictly necessary, so as to build trust from the very beginning.

Destination App. Apart from the tourist information offices and guides, modern tourists like to have all or most of the information in their smartphone. Apps provide excellent information services, being able to provide tailored information on demand, high quality pictures and videos, downloadable maps, and many other features.

In the case of Tourism 3.0, Apps may be also a tool to foster tourist contribution to the content marketing system and product co-creation. Apps can operate like a channel through which the tourist provides service reviews and ratings, creative reviews about products, pictures, videos and text based stories, etc. It is important to point out that the destination should count on many free wifi areas to empower the Apps in providing all the possible services and up to date information.

Finally, Apps may also be a sales channel, providing access to the destination branded souvenirs online store, booking service, and also offering special deals near the location of the tourist through the geolocalization technology. Altogether, it is a very powerful tool, which is actually likely to become the main information supplier and the main channel to connect tourists with the destination operators. Closely related to the App services, the new technologies for augmented reality should also be included to provide a higher experiential value to the tourists through their mobile devices.

Which other programs would you consider to enhance the destination marketing?