Tag: Innovative culture

Co-creationCollaborative business modelsCollaborative cultureCulture changeInnovation

Presidential Innovation Fellows: Co-innovating with (We) the People

As it has been explained in the posts about destination models 3.0, these intend to leverage the intelligence, creativity, initiative and influential power of all its stakeholders from the outset, not only in product and content co-creation, but also up to the business model innovation. In this regard, considering the Destination Management Organisation (DMO) as the destination’s government from the planning and management perspective, some governments are developing innovative practices in this direction, which should inspire also the destinations’ governance organisations.

Some governments are trying to lessen political apathy by engaging citizens in crowdsourcing initiatives for a variety of areas of innovation and decision taking on public affairs. But besides the attempt to prevent further public institutions disaffection, those governments tapping into the knowledge and abilities of citizens are also discovering the benefits to reach beyond the usual experts to expand and diversify the talent pool tackling a problem.

U.S Government and more specifically Obama administration has been especially active in government-driven crowdsourcing competitions and collaborations. Across government, all sorts of agencies are implementing hundreds of crowdsourcing approaches, citizen science programs, and other efforts that have brought the best ideas and talent together to solve mission-centric problems. Last year alone, Federal agencies ran over 85 prize competitions, from small-dollar prizes to winnings of $100,000 or more.

The Presidential Innovation Fellows (PIF) program brings the innovation economy into government, by pairing talented, diverse technologists and innovators with top civil-servants and change-makers within the federal government to tackle some our nation’s biggest challenges.
This program brings the principles, values, and practices of the innovation economy into government through the most effective agents of change we know: our people. This highly-competitive program pairs talented, diverse technologists and innovators with top civil-servants and change-makers working at the highest levels of the federal government to tackle some our nation’s biggest challenges. These teams of government experts and private-sector doers take a user-centric approach to issues at the intersection of people, processes, products, and policy to achieve lasting impact.

Fellows selected for this unique, and highly-competitive opportunity serve for 12 months, during which they will collaborate with each other and federal agency partners on high-profile initiatives aimed at saving lives, saving taxpayer money, fueling job creation, and building the culture of entrepreneurship and innovation within government. As stated in its website, PIF offers to talented individuals from diverse backgrounds “the unique opportunity to work on truly awesome projects with the potential to make a positive impact, with a user base of more than 300 million Americans.”

About the Fellowship

The Presidential Innovation Fellows (PIF) program was established by the White House in 2012 to attract top innovators into government, capable of tackling issues at the convergence of technology, policy, and process.

The PIF program is administered as a partnership between the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), the White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and the General Services Administration (GSA). In 2013, the PIF program established a permanent home and program office within GSA.

Program Details

The Fellowship is a 12-month program, during which Fellows are embedded within a federal agency to collaborate on challenges with innovators inside government. Fellows are based in Washington D.C. for the duration of their Fellowship, and are considered full-time employees of the federal government.

Fellows operate with wide latitude for individual initiative in planning and executing solutions to problem, and spend a significant portion of their time co-working and collaborating with other Fellows. Throughout the program, Fellows receive support from partners in the White House and change-agents across various federal agencies.

Created in 2012, opportunities for Fellows participating in the program have already include creating new crowdsourcing tools to empower survivors and first responders during natural disasters, significantly improving the quality of US patent system, or even addressing asteroid threats to human populations. Fellows have also unleashed the power of open government data to spur the creation of new products and jobs; designed pilot projects that make it easier for new economy companies to do business with the Federal Government; and much more. These are some of many other resultant projects:

This article is from  www.co-society.com/presidential-innovation-fellows-co-innovating-people/

www.whitehouse.gov/innovationfellows

Business trendsCollaborative business modelsCollaborative cultureInnovationInnovative culture

Co-Innovation will be a new growth path for companies, Singapore considered

Collaborative innovation is one of the key concepts that set Destinations 3.0 apart from others, and one of the main sources of competitive advantage. Singapore –the second most competitive economy worldwide according to the World Competitiveness Index- is an example of best practices in collaborative innovation between the public and private sector.

The Singapore Government launched about five years ago a Public Private Co-Innovation Partnership (CI Partnership) programme to encourage the co-development of innovative solutions with the private sector to meet the government’s longer term needs. The initiative was inspired by part of the recommendations of the Singapore Ministry of Finance Economic Strategies Committee (ESC) in which it was included the idea that Co-Innovation would be a new growth path for companies.

The programme involves the Government committing $450m over 5 years to fund such collaborations. For each of these projects, companies interested in co-developing solutions with the Government can apply for funding to do so.

The CI Partnership works on a public-private problem-based approach to innovation. Public agencies first define Government’s needs where there are no identified “off-the-shelf” solutions. Interested companies can then submit their proposals and ideas for projects to the agencies. Depending on the project, promising proposals can be funded to test the feasibility of the concept, develop prototypes or to test-bed the solution.

Interested companies can log on to the co-innovation website at http://www.coinnovation.gov.sg in which is possible to read Government explanation for the programme:

“Today, in an increasingly complex environment, Government faces many challenges and needs that do not have existing solutions. Singapore companies have the innovation potential to meet those needs. The central idea behind the CI Partnership is that Government can better serve the public through innovations borne out of public-private partnership”.

www.coinnovation.gov.sg

This article is from www.co-society.com/co-innovation-will-new-growth-path-companies-singapore-considered

 

Co-creationCollaborative cultureCulture changeInnovationInnovative culture

Co-ideation with employees, a first step for a much needed mindset and culture change

Destinations 3.0 intend to engage both the DMO employees and local stakeholders in co-creating contents and products in the form of life-changing experiences. This article brings us a case study showing how to create innovation teams and foster internal cooperation to boost innovation.

New collaboration efforts on innovation are usually almost exclusively put on initiatives, partnerships or projects with some other companies or external agents as providers, distributors, developers, academics or even customers. But often there is another area where to try to make the most of collaboration to innovate in a way that is easier, less risky and many times as fruitful: within the companies themselves.

Co-innovation between different departments or with employees not directly linked with innovation functions it’s still unusual. Maybe one of the reasons is because it’s kind of counterintuitive to think that anything else is needed to foster collaboration once you hire talent and put it under the same roof with common goals. But in practice, things do not work this way.

We have already some experience initiating and managing processes within companies of different sorts and from different sectors in order to create innovation teams with employees never before asked to think and implement new ideas. It’s not an easy task. Tools and methodology are needed. It is also very important for companies trying to tap into own talent for innovation to constantly explore what is going on beyond the walls of their sites, areas of expertise, business model and industry  to avoid the syndrome that make internal ideas often biased by a reapplication of knowledge, methods, and solutions which hinders creativity and market sensitivity.

But outputs are positive and important. For start, a first experience that acts as a necessary spark for a culture and mindset change in order to create a needed “company’s second operating system”, the one in charge of the future of the organizations. Co-innovate internally is the best first step and learning & testing way to co-innovate with external agents afterwards.

There are many ways to foster internal collaboration to innovate. Siemens is one of the big global companies that puts lots of efforts into their innovation goals and they have lots of initiatives on open innovation, co-creation and co-ideation within the company itself. This article describes two of the tools the company is using successfully for such a goal: TechnoWeb, an online platform that can be used by all Siemens employees worldwide to share ideas and research trends; and an Open Co-Ideation competition that invites researchers from different departments to share their knowledge.

TechnoWeb and the Open Co-Ideation competition exemplify new approaches for the internal generation of ideas, some of them already turned into successful company products as the article shows. But more importantly, they are causing Siemens’ corporate culture to change. As Christoph Krois, responsible for innovation management at Siemens, explains:  “It’s no longer a case of my knowledge, your knowledge, or my precious secrets, because as we proved with this tools and processes, knowledge is the only thing that increases if you share it”.

You may check the original source at Co-ideation and Knowledge-Sharing culture in Siemens

This post is from www.co-society.com/co-ideation-employees-first-step-much-needed-mindset-culture-change/

What cultural barriers prevent these innovation practices from being developed more often in corporations?

 

Collaborative business modelsCollaborative cultureInnovationInnovative cultureOpen innovation

The Marketing Plan 3.0: Developing a network of professional contributors

The development of a network of professional contributors should entail the following steps:

  • Set innovation goals and metrics to track results. Considering all kinds of desired outputs, set innovation goals and objectives in accordance with the executive board and innovation advisors. Formulate specific, measurable and time-bounded objectives, and prioritize them to build the innovation system according to the real needs and guide the innovation efforts. Then, design a set of metrics to monitor the project’s results.
  • Draft a comprehensive list of the needed profiles encompassing researchers, idea generators, producers and experts in all fields, as long as innovation is to be carried out by groups including these four contributor profiles. Some of them may be Strategy consultants, IT consultants, environmental experts, without disregarding some professionals for content creation such as writers, graphic designers, photographers and audiovisual developers.
  • Research networks and identify potential contributors. Get to know them well to create a database including their skills, experience, education, achievements, professional interests, associated network, and personal remarks regarding their concerns, values and aspirations. Invite them to a business oriented presentation explaining the goals and operation of the Open Innovation System, also to sense their interest and vision.
  • Identify potential leaders. As the open innovation has to work as a decentralized system with many leaders, it is necessary to have one in each field of expertise at the very least. These should have collaborative mindsets and empowering leadership style to further engage other contributors. Further, there should be some key influencers and destination executives championing the open innovation development to involve new contributors.
  • Market contribution as an opportunity to showcase their skills, connect with like-minded professionals, build reputation within their professional community, get rewards according to their contribution, achieve visible results that may bring them more professional credit, etc. Collaborate with professional associations to search for contributors and to market open innovation contribution as a professional opportunity.
  • Design reward system. Research on the market fees for each type of contributor to have a comprehensive fee list considering field of expertise, experience, achievements, proven skills, and other relevant variables. As long as innovation challenges are to be driven by collaboration among contributors, there has to be a way to assess the value of each contribution, as the final result may be a mix of ideas coming from different innovators.
  • Organize a kick-off workshop and open challenge to showcase how the system works. Pose an easy challenge in which most contributors are likely to be rewarded. An initial success story is crucial to motivate contributors in engaging further. Listen to their opinions, reviews and suggestions for improvement. Thank them for their feedback and let them know how useful it has been to streamline the system.

Beyond these initial steps, there are other key success factors that should not be disregarded:

  • Building a culture of trust, innovation and collaboration
  • Searching and connecting with external innovation networks to cooperate
  • Encouraging contributors to travel to bring in new ideas from other destinations
  • Organize workshops to train in co-creation, marketing, leadership and other subjects
  • Identify needed infrastructure to facilitate and enhance collaborative innovation

Keep in mind as an innovation mantra that “those that will succeed are the ones that embrace creativity and experiment with different ways of reaching and engaging their customers”.

Do you think of other necessary tips or key success factors?

Collaborative cultureCulture changeInnovative cultureMarketing 3.0Strategy

The Marketing Plan 3.0: Overcoming barriers in the social media adoption

When introducing and trying to engage employees and community stakeholders in social media platforms, there may be many barriers, fears, concerns and attitudes that pose a cultural change challenge. Therefore, it is necessary to research and listen to these employees and community stakeholders on their opinions, visions and attitudes about engaging in social media to assess the need for a specific culture change and internal marketing strategy to deal with these obstacles. For instance, some of the barriers may be:

  • Fear of negative reaction from customers
  • Lack of time or internal resources
  • Fear of extra workload for the employees
  • Lack of knowledge and expertise
  • Not convinced about its profitability
  • Fear of losing privacy

Once all the barriers are well known, there has to be design and implementation of a Change Strategy to overcome them based on the following sequential patterns:

1. Create a guiding coalition ·   Identify and engage change agents as social media catalysts

·   Assemble a coherent group to lead the change

·   Integrate this team into the affected groups

·   Bring in champions in each group dedicated to social media success

2. Develop a clear vision ·   Create a catalyzing vision for the social media effort

·   Develop strategy in line with the overall vision

3. Share the vision ·   Communicate the vision in every possible way to the community

·   Commit executive and community leadership to supporting the vision

·   Coalition members should be role models for the community

1.    4. Empower people and remove obstacles ·   Organize training courses on storytelling and content creation

·   Organize training courses on social media adapted to all audiences

·   Change structures, systems, compensation and any factors that obstruct the social media effort

5. Secure consistent short-term wins ·   Make public and visible performance improvements

·   Celebrate victories in line with the overall  program vision

·   Reward and recognize those securing the wins

·   Publicize the progress of the project together with the contests

6. Consolidate and keep moving ·  Use momentum to gradually change all systems and processes that don’t support the program’s success

·  Enable change agents throughout the organization and community

·  Energize the project with consistent flow of new content of all types

7. Anchor the program in the organization and the community ·  New approach should be anchored in the culture of the community

·  Real key to social media success is in transforming the organization and community to the culture of a social enterprise

·  Maintain consistent action to further embed behaviors and discipline

 Do you think of other barriers or necessary steps to overcome the stated ones?

Collaborative cultureCulture changeInnovative cultureMarketing 3.0Strategy

The Marketing Plan 3.0: changing values and behaviors

The development of the Marketing Plan 3.0 may present two cultural challenges:

  • The need for developing a new set of values as organizational standards of behavior, as a key success factor of the new values driven marketing
  • The need to overcome barriers in the adoption of the social media and content marketing engagement by the employees and the local community

Beyond the life-changing experiences and the related stories, to keep the brand integrity and ensure the success of the new marketing endeavor it is necessary that the employees and partners’ behaviors faithfully reflect the preached values. Therefore, it is probably necessary to develop a culture change program, at least to harmonize certain critical behaviors throughout the destination stakeholder community.

Designed upon consensus among the key stakeholders and community leaders, there has to be a set of values underlying the behaviors to be promoted throughout the community. Such values should be cooperation, innovation and openness to new ideas, integrity and transparency, initiative, sustainability, solidarity, common good, etc. To convince stakeholders of assuming the new set of values, it is recommendable to elaborate a Case for Change, which contains the following pieces:

  • Context: why changes are needed now, stating opportunities and threats that justify it.
  • Changes: what has to change, who is to be affected and what does not have to change
  • Process: how the proposed changes are to be implemented and expected timing
  • Benefits: who benefits from the changes (destination, community, individuals, etc.)
  • Consequences: what would happen if these changes are delayed
  • Expectations: the role every stakeholder has to play
  • Commitment: leaders have to present the Case for Change to the community, stating their explicit commitments that ultimately make them accountable to the community.

Once the Case for Change has been defined, it’s time to implement it following five principles:

  • Train employees, partners and community members on how to apply the new set of values on a daily basis, with especial emphasis on their relationships with tourists.
  • Putting the new values into practice by changing behaviors
  • Leaders have to preach by example, becoming the key role models that inspire everybody
  • Ensure that everyone is aligned with the new values and behaviors, and correct if necessary
  • Celebrate results achieved by any employee or community member to encourage others

The key ideas of driving culture change to understand are that this has to be started from the leadership positions, well communicated to convince their organization or community while listening, understanding and addressing their possible resistance, preaching by example, achieving and celebrating results, and benefiting all stakeholders to prevent further resistance.

The Whitepaper on “Building a culture of collaboration and innovation” is to develop in detail the key factors to a successful cultural change into developing the desired attitudes.

Would you consider other points in designing and implementing the Case for change?

Business model innovationMarketing 3.0Tourism trends

The Vision of Tourism 3.0

As the world is evolving at a faster pace than ever before, so are the needs, motivations, and concerns that drive the evolution of modern societies, and hence the kind of relationship that customers wish to develop with brands, as well as what they expect from them, which ultimately challenges business models to reinvent themselves towards the so called Marketing 3.0 approach.

As explained by Philip Kotler in his book “Marketing 3.0”, this new approach considers customers as values-driven people and potential collaborators. They are increasingly concerned about issues such as poverty alleviation, sociocultural change and environmental sustainability, and expect brands to address its related challenges. Companies should embed these issues deeply within their mission, leading to a new perspective that ultimately transforms the lives of the stakeholders.

Such a mission needs to be spread to all potential stakeholders with compelling stories that engage them to become part of the solution. Such stories raise the concept of marketing to the field of values, intending to leap forward from functional and emotional marketing to human spirit marketing.

Marketing 3.0 also embraces the new social wave, where customers are more aware and active, empowering them not only to participate by giving their opinions about products and marketing campaigns but also to co-create them, thus becoming key players within the marketing strategies. This new approach demands marketers to understand human anxieties and desires, which nowadays are increasingly rooted in creativity, culture, and the environment.

The tourism industry has embraced many of these trends and concerns with the raise of phenomena such as ecotourism or responsible tourism. However, these businesses usually remain at small scale and niche focused, at a disadvantage to most conventional ones, mostly in terms of marketing power.

The next destination generation intends to address these drawbacks by fostering collaboration among all destination stakeholders (employees, customers, shareholders, suppliers, government, partners, travel agents, local community, etc.) to create authentic and life-transforming experiences that appeal not only to the tourists’ functional and emotional needs, but also to their human spirit.

Furthermore, this collaboration and community involvement is leveraged to create stories about the experiences happening in the destination, which ultimately become the main marketing content drawing attention and engaging tourists and other potential stakeholders.

Therefore, the vision of Tourism 3.0 consists of a tourism development based upon collaborative business models operating as open innovation ecosystems, where all stakeholders are empowered to participate in the generation of experiences and stories that address their concerns and focus on their functional, emotional, and spiritual fulfillment.

The mission of this blog is to share and discuss ideas on how to design and develop strategies to transform destinations towards the principles of the tourism 3.0.