Tag: clustering strategy

Environmental sustainabilityStrategySustainabilityThird sector and social sustainability

Key strategies to address Barcelona’s tourism challenges

Historic overview. Barcelona is a case study where many of the mentioned strategies have been used. Till 1992, when the Olympic Games were celebrated, the city was a second tier destination within the European circuits. Despite having held two International Exhibitions, it had lost most of its appeal as a destination. However, the city carried out an extensive renovation to be prepared for the Olympics, and this resulted in relaunching many depressed clusters by leveraging their potential, as well as creating some brand new clusters.

Till then Barcelona had lived with its back facing the sea, and many parts of the old town were depressed and abandoned to the lowest class social sectors, also suffering from safety issues. So the greatest renovation was both in the waterfront and the depressed areas of the Old town. Further, directly related with the Olympics, a new district was built to host the Olympic Villa, where there was also the Olympic Port; and in the Montjuic area there was rebuilt the old Olympic Stadium keeping the original facade, and many other sport facilities were created.

The city regained its waterfront as one of the most attractive areas, creating two clusters for entertainment and many kilometers of beaches with a maritime promenade between the two clusters. Further, the Old town was equipped with culture entertainment facilities and many open spaces were created to attract both locals and visitors. The renovation consisted also of fostering the refurbishment of the old buildings with subsidies and building new residential buildings. This renovation drew the interest of the locals as an attractive location for housing.

As a result, these once-depressed areas started attracting new businesses such as shops, cafes, restaurants and accommodation facilities. Within a few years, they cleaned their image to a shining one like the most attractive areas of the town. All in all, the city leveraged all its potential charm and attractiveness namely based upon resources that were abandoned and through the vision of the city planning developers. From then on, the city started marketing itself as a new venue for international events, thanks to the regained reputation for the good organization of the Olympic Games, and as a tourism destination for city breaks among others.

Further on, Barcelona kept on targeting new market segments, leveraging and marketing under exploited heritage and also developing new clusters. In that sense, it took the leading position as a Cruise destination in the Mediterranean, which used to be Genoa. A few years after, the city’s tourism board started promoting the architectural heritage from Antoni Gaudi, as an attraction unique to Barcelona. At the same time, a new cluster was being created, also in the waterfront, to hold the International Forum of Cultures –a new kind of International Exhibition-, where a new residential area was built, along with Congress & Convention facilities and an iconic building which was later on to the Museum of Natural Sciences.

Over the last years two more clusters have been developed. First, the extension of the International Exhibition facilities in L’Hospitalet –Barcelona’s neighbor town- to host large international exhibitions and congresses such as the Mobile World Congress; and second, the last cluster to be developed –in this case, extended- was that of Sagrada Família Temple –the city’s top attraction- with the opening of St. Pau Hospital as a cultural center boasting the largest modernist enclosure in the city, within a five minute walk from the Temple.

New challenges. Despite being one of the top European urban destinations in terms of tourism revenue, the tourism development has raised the residents’ protests on the tourists’ behavior, the proliferation of tourist apartments which overload certain areas with too many visitors, the effect of these tourist apartments on the real estate prices, and the dominance of tourists in many public spaces. Further, there has been a growth of low budget travelers, whose expenditure is barely profitable for the city. At the same time, the raise of the Airbnb model has spread the tourism use of the residential areas. All these issues have invited the residents and the City Council to a reflection on what is the adequate Tourism model.

While the debate is still in process, this is a very good case to exemplify how the aforementioned strategies may solve some of the challenges typical of mature destinations. First are explained the clusters diagnosis and the corresponding cluster based solutions for each one, and finally the cross-destination programs to tackle the aforementioned challenges. In this case, only four clusters concentrate the suggested renovation.

Montjuic Mountain: “The Garden of Barcelona”. This is where the main Olympic facilities where built, nowadays used for sporting and cultural events. Despite the Montjuic Castle and two art museums, the area is quite underexploited, and is clearly a second tier cluster, with no must see attractions. However there is a large space where attractive attractions could be developed to make most of the tourists spend at least half a day of their stay in this area:

  • Using the Montjuic Castle as a venue for cultural events, combined with a street food market area with small outdoor restaurants, open on high season weekends and summer weeks.
  • Creating a first-class “botanical themed garden” with plants and urban aesthetics representing different world areas (Mediterranean, Japan, etc.), colorful vegetation, etc.

Forum Port: “Innovative entertainment”.  This is one of the most underexploited areas of Barcelona, where the International Forum of Cultures was celebrated in 2004. At present there is one Convention center and the Natural Science Museum in the Forum’s iconic building. This could be a cluster characterized by imaginative entertainment experiences, combined with iconic buildings with futuristic architectural style. These could be:

  • Imax & 3D Cinema in a ball shaped building with mirroring facade in a central location within the Forum area, as one of the most iconic buildings.
  • Large Aquarium in iconic building boasting species from different world regions, and including restaurants inside or beside the tank and a hotel with room views to the tank and the sea.
  • Seaplane terminal in the Port, offering sightseeing flights all over Catalonia, and possibly to some seaside destinations within Catalonia or the Balearic Islands.
  • “Dancing Springs Show” in the central area of the Port, installing a stable platform underwater with programmable springs to perform a light & music & water show.
  • Celebrity chef restaurants along the waterfront terraces of the Port, with exclusive views to the “Dancing Springs Show” and other selected performances.

Old Harbor: “Mediterranean history & tradition”. This is one of the clusters with the highest potential, given its privileged location nearby the Old town, and the most touristy waterfront area. Although it is already a very exploited cluster, the mix of attractions is far from optimum, as it is offering only a standardized experience, without any character related to the destination identity, nor with distinct value proposition. The proposal is to create:

  • Mediterranean Village with stores, restaurants, hotels and night entertainment. It would reproduce the local fishermen villages’ style, providing a truly Mediterranean experience.
  • 3 caravel reproductions in real size representing the ones with which Columbus discovered America. One would be a boutique hotel, another one a restaurant and the other a museum.

Poblenou district: “The art district”. This is a district with many faces at present: the Olympic Villa near the waterfront, the old Poblenou town with its village’s charm, and the old industrial Poblenou, full of warehouses and old factories with an abandoned atmosphere. The idea is to transform all this semi-abandoned area into an art district, filling both the open and the indoor spaces with sculptures and various types of art pieces. This would entail creating a new cluster from scratch, although leveraging most of the existing infrastructure, but filling it with an innovative experience system.

The Art district concept is both an incubator for new artists and an art marketplace. It is a destination model 3.0 in its full extent: a platform where many service suppliers (artists) can participate under a series of stated rules to contribute in creating a memorable experience characterized by both harmony and variety. The artist portfolio would encompass many types of art: scenic arts, sculpture, painting, handcrafting with glass, ceramic, etc.

An approach on the strategic and operational functioning may be found in the Whitepaper “Envisioning destination models 3.0”, but the upcoming Whitepaper “Envisioning Art Villages 3.0” will explain in more detail how this has to work.

These cluster developments are to create a sum of tourism attractions that correspond to and strengthen the aforementioned cluster identity, such as that of a Theme Park, but with original and authentic experiences targeting all segments, that you would never find in any Theme Park.

Beyond these key cluster developments, it is necessary to encourage tourists to visit these new areas, which should not only be achieved through good marketing but also by creating a network of charming transport systems. In the case of Barcelona, it could be a network of Old tramways, like the ones that used to circulate in the city many decades ago. The network would be the minimum necessary to reach all of these clusters through the nicest streets and avenues of the city.

Furthermore, as stated in the theoretical introduction, these new clusters should host many of the new accommodation developments to contribute in spreading the tourism flows.

Further, the development of these clusters would solve some of the mentioned issues:

  • Increasing the tourism expenditure: through the creation of the new clusters both the average stay and the visit repetition would likely increase, and many of the clusters would be to attract high expenditure tourists, namely that of the Forum Port. Concentrating the development of new accommodation in top end hotels or boutique hotels would strongly contribute to attract such kinds of tourists.
  • Demand for new accommodation development: many of the new clusters –if not all- could contribute in hosting some of the new accommodation facilities, also offering innovative concepts like art boutique hotel in the art district, garden boutique hotel in Montjuic, Mediterranean village boutique hotel in the Old harbor, the aforementioned hotel in the Aquarium tank, and many others, namely near the Forum Port cluster.
  • Conviviality with residents in the night-time: some of these clusters –namely the Forum Port and the Old harbor- could concentrate the nightlife of the city from a certain time on, prohibiting the operation of discotheques and night clubs in residential areas, so as to deviate all the noisy tourists in the non-residential clusters during the night-time. To make that work, there should be good public transport availability until the closing of these clubs.

Other issues regarding the proliferation of tourist apartments, the need to share the benefits of tourism with the poorer layers of society, and the rise in Airbnb based offers and its effect on the increase of the real estate prices could be addressed through policies such as:

  • Limiting the offer of Airbnb rooms to 1 room per apartment, 1 apartment per owner and also depending on the offer of every district, being more constrained in the areas suffering from congestion issues and with more accommodation offer.
  • Creating a body to control the non-regulated accommodation offer, enforcing the previous regulations to prevent the issues that residents complain about.
  • Offering the current night clubs in the areas suffering from conviviality issues a priority treatment to settle in the new clusters where nightlife is to be relocated, before they have to close or reconvert their current business.
  • Implement a limited capacity system and advance online booking in the cultural facilities such as monuments or museums, to avoid congestion and queues, and to enforce visitors to plan their visits in advance.
  • Create a tourism tax to make the tourists and tourism business contribute to the public expenses related to tourism spaces and subsidized public services they take advantage of. This could also help, by diminishing the business profitability, to lower the upward pressure of the real estate prices.

Do you think of other strategies to address Barcelona’s tourism challenges?

Environmental sustainabilityStrategySustainabilityThird sector and social sustainability

Typical challenges in mature destinations (II)

Lack of infrastructure renovation. Old destinations usually suffer from some kind of obsolescence at some point, not only regarding the transport or accommodation infrastructures, but also others such the buildings facades, the urban aesthetics, etc. All together, these elements may eventually give an image of decadence. However, this need for renovation may be regarded as an opportunity to develop each cluster’s identity, leveraging their uniqueness and their heritage to make them shine to the utmost.

Beyond usual competitiveness programs regarding accommodation facilities upgrade or quality labels certification, in line with the Re-clustering strategy suggested before in this section, some programs regarding the facades refurbishment and the development of unique urban aesthetics style for each cluster, using typical designs or elements that represent their identity.

Furthermore, beyond urban aesthetics renovation, an excellent way to change the atmosphere from decadence to lively and vibrant is to introduce elements of animation such as artists performing in the public spaces (painters, musicians, etc.) and imaginative illumination at night, in accordance with the type of atmosphere that is to be created.

Lack of new tourism businesses. A very different problem occurs when there is lack of private initiative to start up new businesses related to tourism. This may mean that the destination has no demand growth, but also that it is not capable of attracting new market segments or inspiring new experiences based on the current resources.

This challenge may be solved through either new cluster development or cluster reconversion, opening a new area with new resources to be exploited for tourism, which necessarily needs new business to operate, may inspire new experiences and attract new market segments. Complementing this move, there are two other possible programs to foster entrepreneurship. First, using one of the key concepts of Tourism 3.0, the development of an open innovation system is likely to bring in new business ideas and identify unsatisfied demands.

The second possible program is to create a tourism business incubator, facilitating entrepreneurs to start-up their business with a co-working space and business training at a subsidized cost for a certain period of time. Business incubators are to diminish the risk of business failure throughout the first months of the new business life. It is therefore a platform to encourage creative entrepreneurs to develop their ideas into the market.

Tourism expenditure & seasonality stagnation. Expenditure depends on many factors, such as the targeted segments, the geographical markets, the infrastructure and experiences attractiveness. Generating higher expenditure requires namely developing segments that target the wealthiest tourists: Luxury, MICE, Golf, Gambling, Special Interest, etc. with the adequate infrastructure and offering a charming and harmonic atmosphere leveraging the character of the destination, to attract investors, operators and, of course, the tourists.

Demand seasonality is another issue. It depends also on market segments and geographical markets, as some types of holidays or tourism related activities take place during the mid and low season. Also not all countries have their holiday at the same time, so there are many opportunities in this regard for marketing in new countries.

In both cases the idea of developing new or reconverted clusters to attract new market segments is more than appropriate, as it is also convenient to upgrade accommodation facilities and enhance the charm of the clusters to attract new businesses such as hotels, branded stores, prestigious restaurants and other entertainment infrastructures.

Poor branding, lost reputation, low brand awareness, etc. Marketing is always part of the problem and part of the solution. The cluster related solutions to brand challenges may be either the creation of new clusters, cluster reconversion or re-clustering the destination by developing each cluster identity and character. In this regard, providing a sense of variety to the visitor is strengthening the brand with more value.

Based upon these new developments, reconversions and re-clustering, it is important to define an identity for each cluster, where the experiences and the atmosphere feelings are reflecting this identity and character. So long as the most powerful marketing comes from the visitors’ opinions and recommendations, their experiences on site are the key brand developers.

Then, beyond the destination cluster development, a very effective marketing is –especially when there is a new cluster development- to organize a noteworthy international event that puts the destination in the spotlight of the outbound markets’ media and thus puts the destination brand at the target visitors’ top of mind.

What other challenges are usual in mature destinations?

StrategyStrategy planning & execution

How cluster development applies to mature destinations

Most of the aforementioned challenges faced by mature destinations may be solved, at least partly, through an adequate cluster development strategy. Furthermore, cluster development strategies may have many other benefits for the destination. The following strategies summarize most of the approaches to cluster based developments in destinations:

New cluster development. Many destinations use undeveloped areas without any relevant resource, to build new tourism infrastructures which all together are to create a new tourism cluster. This is usually related to Theme Parks, Congress & Convention facilities or other modern buildings hosting all kinds of entertainment experiences. This is the case of the “Arts and Sciences City” in Valencia, an outstanding collection of innovative architecture facilities designed by the architect Santiago Calatrava encompassing an Opera House, a Science Museum, an Imax Cinema, an Aquarium and a Venue for various types of events.

Reconverting or relaunching existing clusters. Some destinations have unexploited natural or cultural resources, which are not leveraged as tourism attractions namely due to lack of vision or imagination. These type of developments should always be a priority, so long as they enhance the identity and uniqueness of the destination. This is the case of Shanghai’s Xintiandi and Tianzifang, two areas within the downtown’s French district with old houses and unique atmospheres, which have been reconverted as charming shopping and entertainment clusters, with many types of stores and restaurants.

Re-clustering the destination. Some destinations are perceived rather as homogeneous, or they do not have a defined characterization throughout its areas. However, the reality is that in most cases there are some distinct features in the different areas that may be leveraged to build a cluster identity. In this case, the cluster development strategy consists of enhancing and marketing the differentiated character of each cluster, providing a sense of variety to the visitor. This is what some Ski resorts do, “Theme-Parking” themselves to some extent, with distinct urban aesthetics, music, etc. to build a different atmosphere in every zone.

Cluster enhancement. As it is explained in the Whitepaper “Competitiveness Planning 3.0”, clusters should be reference units when assessing the destination’s competitiveness, and also when planning competitiveness programs. So long as each cluster may be considered as a sub-destination, with its own strengths and weaknesses, every cluster should follow its own development in accordance with its intended identity, adding more value, reducing risks and discomforts and marketing itself according to its distinct value proposition. This is the very minimum that a mature destination should do to not pass from maturity to decadence.

Based on these standard strategies, cluster development may contribute to solve some of the aforementioned challenges that are usual in mature destinations, so long as they are combined with the appropriate competitiveness programs and marketing strategies and activities. All tourism development strategies are interrelated, and so they need to be coherently weaved to be successfully implemented.

Do you think of other cluster development based strategies?

StrategyStrategy planning & executionSustainability

Clustering strategy for mature destinations

Destinations operating since decades ago reach a stage of maturity sooner or later, in which they stop growing and lose the strength and vibrancy that made them grow. At this point, depending on the conditions of the environment and will of the local inhabitants, many destinations prefer to manage this situation without growing anymore, so long as they are not willing to receive more tourists or they don’t want to extend the destination’s urban area with accommodation facilities or second residences, and keep the destination as it is to preserve its original charm, and avoid the risk of spoiling it with tourism overflows.

Other destinations, however, due to the need or will for the tourism business growth, try to find other solutions to satisfy a higher demand trying not to spoil the charm that attracts the tourism flows. Further, these destinations face many challenges such as:

  • Congestion issues in the most popular areas
  • Difficult conviviality between locals and tourists
  • Excessive dominance of tourism related businesses in residential areas
  • Lack of infrastructure renovation, which may give an image of decadence
  • Tourism expenditure stagnation
  • Seasonality stagnation due to incapacity to overcome seasonal occupancy gaps
  • Poor branding, lost reputation, low brand awareness, lack of well-defined identity, etc.
  • Lack of new tourism businesses creation

These and many other issues may be resolved through adequate tourism development planning, in which a good cluster development strategy is to have a key role in overcoming them successfully.

Which other issues affect mature destinations?

StrategyStrategy planning & executionTourism marketing

Clustering benefits for marketing

So long as every type of environment is more or less adequate for certain types of activities, the correct matching between the location and the activities developed is a key factor for competitiveness and also for effective marketing, as it helps to build a cluster’s consistent identity, enhancing the character of the experience and also helping the tourists to envision what kind of feelings they are likely to experience.

Closely related to competitiveness and productivity, business concentration may also accelerate innovation in product development and process efficiency. Having a pool of competitors in the same geographical area facilitates benchmarking and stimulates innovation, so long as proximity leads to constant comparison and competition.

Furthermore, attractions concentration in a cluster makes it possible to design more attractive packages in the travel market, as well as to attract more transport operators –namely flights and bus regular lines-, which eventually open new markets. Competitive clusters attract also internationally branded operators –like reputable hotel chains-, which eventually contribute to the reputation and attractiveness of the cluster.

Other marketing benefits may come from the cooperation in marketing activities by the cluster’s operators. This includes market intelligence collection and management through a local “Tourism Observatory”, but also from sharing efforts and information for the cluster’s marketing planning, and operational marketing activities.

Through cluster based collaboration, all these benefits can be enhanced, due to the multiplier effects of more productivity, innovation and business growth in a cluster influences many other industries within the region.

Do you think of other clustering benefits for marketing?

StrategyStrategy planning & execution

Clustering benefits for profitability and growth

The concentration of many attractions and related services within an area, specialized in a certain type of activities is likely to attract other operators dealing with this type of activity, as this is where their potential clients go and so as to profit from the existing tourism flows and necessary services available in that area. This saves them many marketing costs, and also results in a much lower risk investment. Therefore, consolidated and competitive clusters are more likely to attract investors.

Further, as it happens in all industries’ clusters, business’ concentration reduces trading costs, thus enhancing profitability. As in all types of clusters, there are also common infrastructures and key resources, which shared among many operators, reduces its cost per operator, through creating economies of scale.

Moreover, concentration helps to boost cooperation, and by joining efforts, partners not only accelerate innovation and develop economies of scale by sharing strategic resources, but also cooperate in lobbying to gain negotiation power against common suppliers and clients, as well as to counter or neutralize other competitive forces that shape the long term industry’s profitability. The Whitepaper “The 5 Competitive forces and business strategy” depicts how these 5 forces shape the long term profitability in the tourism industry.

In many cases, companies in a specialized cluster have a better access to skilled employees and specialized suppliers, also located within the cluster influence area. Institutions or Universities can be used mutually and capital expenditures in regional marketing, infrastructure or education programs can be employed and shared together (Müller and Lanz 1998). Finally, cluster based tourism attractions’ concentration is also beneficial to profitability as long as it contributes to extending the average tourist length of stay.

Beyond profitability, consolidated clusters are also likely to foster more new business creation. First, a concentrated clients’ base lowers the risks for new suppliers to settle in, and as a result of the cluster based boosted innovation, also more spin-offs and start-ups are likely to be created. Further, financial institutions have a good knowledge about the industry, and so they are more likely to provide financial support to new ventures.

Do you think of other clustering benefits for profitability and growth?

StrategyStrategy planning & execution

Cluster based competitive advantages

In line with the origins of cluster development, the combination and cooperation of many resources and operators may result in many types of competitive advantages:

Resource uniqueness: many clusters feature a unique collection of natural or cultural resources. Cases of cultural resources could be the Egyptian Pyramid cluster along the Nile River, or the Maya Pyramid cluster in Yucatan Peninsula. Examples of unique clusters based on natural heritage could be Iceland with its unique combination of volcanos, glaciers and northern lights, or the Tanzanian cluster with Mount Kilimanjaro and the Masai mara safaris.

Experience innovation: some clusters have, beyond competitive natural or cultural resources, a special deed for innovating experiences. Such is the case of Queenstown in New Zealand’s Southern Island, the most innovative destination for adventure tourism activities, where bungee jumping was invented, among many other crazy experiences. Developing unique experiences without unique resources requires building a culture of innovation.

Operators’ cooperation: the good coordination and cooperation among the cluster operators may also be the source of competitive advantage. The case of the Trois Vallées ski area, the largest ski-lift connected ski area in Europe illustrates this type of advantage. This dominion has no unique resources like other areas in the Alps –namely Zermatt-, but the connection between the three valleys offers the best mobility efficiency for skiers who want to enjoy the whole ski dominion, allowing them to enjoy all the ski areas spending the least possible time.

Differentiated product experience: clusters featuring one main product may develop their competitive advantage by creating a unique signature experience, adding an extra value that other cluster rivals do not offer. This is the case, for instance, of the Austrian Tirol for ski holidays, offering a unique “après-ski experience” consisting with traditional Tirolean pubs with local atmosphere and also a world class network of Wellness & Spa facilities. The Ski Resorts’ accommodation facilities are all in old villages, which also give character to the experience.

Dimension: some clusters base their competitiveness in offering the largest amount of facilities or resources for a specific kind of tourism activity. Such is the case of the Golf Cluster in Costa del Sol as a Winter Golf destination in Europe. On the other side of the world, the Australian Great Barrier Reef is the largest coral reef on earth, a paradise for divers. Another example could be Macau, featuring the largest offer of Casinos in Asia.

Variety: many tourists are not only motivated for one type of activity but prefer to enjoy many different experiences during their holidays. Clusters offering a large number of different attractions appeal to an increasing number of tourists. Such is the case of the Costa Brava, offering not only attractive beaches, but also first class gastronomy, unique cultural heritage sites, a Golf cluster, a protected area for diving, Casinos, facilities for skydiving, Wellness, etc.

Price: for certain products, price is sometimes a decisive factor to gain competitiveness, especially in the case of the most standardized ones. As it happens with clusters in other industries, the competition of many operators may result in a price advantage for the tourist, though this is not usually the main reason. This could be the case of Tunisian coast cluster competing with European beach destinations, the Red Sea cluster for diving, etc.

Do you think of other cluster based competitive advantages?

Strategy

Types of tourism clusters

The term cluster is used nowadays in many different fields, always to refer to a group of elements that have something in common or do something together. It may be either used to define a large area with many attractions which all together make a competitive destination, or to define an area within a destination with clearly differentiated characteristics compared to the other destination areas. The term cluster may be used as well for conceptual grouping not related to territory, in the fields of marketing and some others.

There may be established an almost endless number of cluster categories in the field of tourism, according to many different criteria, but only a few are considered relevant enough, also to illustrate the different realities in terms of cluster development for destinations.

First of all, depending on the cluster’s resources, regardless of the aforementioned distinctions, there may be three types of clusters:

  • Natural heritage: clusters based on distinguished natural resources for sporting activities or sightseeing such as mountains, marshland areas, etc.
  • Cultural heritage: clusters based on unique or differentiated tangible –monuments- or intangible –traditions, gastronomy- cultural heritage.
  • New developments: clusters based on newly built facilities which attract tourism flows by themselves, such as Theme Parks, Casinos, Museums, Golf, etc.

Second, when referring to clusters that are to define areas with different characteristics within a local destination, there may be:

  • Urban clusters: those differentiated areas within city tourism destinations, either by the architecture style, atmosphere, natural resources like parks, cultural resources such as temples, palaces, museums, etc. Some well-known examples could be Paris with distinct districts and areas such as Montmartre, La Defense, Champs Elysees, Bois de Boulogne, Quartier Latin, etc. where outer connected clusters such as Versailles and Disneyland Paris could also be considered.
  • Mono-product destination clusters: some destinations focused in one main product offer however different areas with distinct atmospheres, based on natural or urban landscape, a different amount of tourism flows, different prices, and even different characteristics directly related with the tourism product. This could be the case of a Theme Park, a Ski resort with ski areas in many valleys or mountains, or National Parks with several areas with different types of landscape and even different animal species to be watched.

Third, when referring to clusters as areas grouping several attractions which all together make a competitive destination, there are also some types of clusters:

  • Touring clusters: these are groups of resources –usually natural or cultural heritage- which are to be discovered by following an itinerary that makes a touring experience. Some of these resources taken individually are not likely to attract many visitors, but as a part of a route they all gain a substantial amount of tourism flows and become a competitive destination. These may be of similar characteristics or quite different. Examples are the Loire Castles cluster in France, the “Norway in a nutshell” route, or the Rhin Castles cluster in Germany.
  • Agglomeration clusters: closely related with the dimension competitive advantage, some destinations become competitive due to the concentration of many attractions of the same kind within a limited area. This usually refers to new development attractions, but may also apply to natural or cultural resources. Such is the case of Theme Park clusters, Golf clusters, Ski clusters, Diving clusters, hiking clusters, etc. Many special interest tourists like to have the chance of experiencing many sites for the same activity during the same holiday period.
  • Multi-product clusters: unlike the agglomeration ones, some clusters base their competitiveness on the variety of products available, attracting those visitors who are interested in living different types of experiences. Some famous cases may be the Hawaii Islands, which are outstanding destination for sun & beach, Congresses & Conventions, but also for Nature tourism –National Parks with active volcanos- and surfing; Eastern Andalucia –in the South of Spain- boasts some of the most popular Sun & beach destinations, plenty of Golf courses, along with hiking & skiing in Sierra Nevada and cultural tourism in Granada.

Do you think of other tourism cluster categories?