Category: Intelligence

Tourism trends and other business’ trends influencing or applicable to the tourism industry

Business model innovationInnovationMarketing 3.0Tourism trends

Connected Museums and connected learning

The presentation below was originally given as a keynote in Taiwan to the Chinese Association of Museums.

Our belief is that the technology like Conducttr can create “intelligent interpretation” – personalized connected experiences that see the museum as part of a deeper ecosystem that includes informal and formal learning.

In the diagram presented here, a cloud-based intelligence understands the learner’s current interest and tailors physical and digital environments to suit.

Note that a common problem for major museums is traffic flow. That is, most visitors want to see the museum’s top attraction. Using Conducttr connected to traffic sensors, guides and screens can be adapted and tweaks to direct visitors to less busy parts of the museum.

 

This blogpost is from  http://www.tstoryteller.com/blog

IntelligenceTourism trends

Some millennials will be driving future tourism growth faster

Think back to your geography classes at school and you may remember studying population pyramids, those diagrams used to show the relative size of different gender and age groups in any given country. Take a look at the population pyramid for most countries in Western Europe and you’ll see a ‘Y’ shape, with a relatively large number of older age groups (the baby boomers), and a comparatively reduced population among the younger age groups. Now go and check out the population pyramids for nations in Southeast Asia, such as Indonesia, Vietnam or the Philippines. You’ll find a cone in the shape of a Thai palace: very heavy at the bottom (with a booming youth population) and very thin towards the top.

Last week I was in Manila to give a presentation at the opening session of MICECON, the national tourism conference of the Philippines. During the few days I was in the country, I was able to see first-hand how young the country is, with millions of children, teenagers and young adults streaming around Manila’s busy streets and malls. The Philippines is a collection of over 7,000 islands that lies in the Pacific, south of Taiwan and north of Indonesia. It’s had a rocky history, variously governed in the past three centuries by Spain, the US and occupying Japanese forces. During the late 20th the country was run by a General Marcos (remember his wife Imelda’s famed collection of shoes?) and has long suffered as one of the poorer Asian nations.

Today however, the country is both generating and benefiting from the wider economic boom in Asia. English is widely spoken by Filipinos, who go for coveted jobs at the country’s growing number of outsourced-call centres. The Asian Development Bank forecasts GDP growth of 6.4% in 2015 and international arrivals in 2014 reached nearly 5 million with the government aiming for strong growth in the coming years. Domestic travel is extremely important since Filipinos largely seek to explore their own country before heading for trips abroad, and there is still much more room for growth among a population which totals over 100 million.

A youthful country preparing for strong growth in the future

Aware that the country’s tourism fortunes will increasingly rest on the Millennial generation from Asia and further afield, the Philippines Department of Tourism invited me to speak at the opening of MICECON, the Filipino national tourism conference to share some insights into the Millennials market, in particular those travelling from other Asian countries. As you may know, Toposphy is already working with the Pacific Asia Travel Association to study the way Asian Millennials travel, in an exciting project called ‘Stepping Out of the Crowd’, and we hope to add this to our insights in the months to come.

At MICECON, it turned out that ‘Millennials’ was the word of the day as the audience in every session asked plenty of questions on this subject. The Filipino travel industry is especially interested in younger travelers, and the reason starts at home. Young Filipinos grow up knowing that their country is a diverse and exciting place to explore, and they usually set out to do just that before heading overseas. Whether it’s for upgrading the country’s supply of accommodation or understanding how to make the most of the boom in Korean students coming to study English (estimates show that nearly 70% of Filipinos are fluent in English), delegates from hotel groups, tour operators and airlines expressed a strong desire to learn more about the Millennial mind-set and apply lessons to their own businesses.

The Philippines today has some strong competitors for many of its products and to some extent, its fragmented nature and distance from mature outbound markets such as the US, Canada and Europe are a disadvantage. The government has also recognized that transport infrastructure is lacking too, but is working hard to overcome these challenges. The country certainly has some outstanding assets, including beaches that match the best of the Caribbean, amazing diving opportunities, beautiful rice terraces, and some well-preserved UNESCO recognized heritage from the 300-year long Spanish era.

Still, in my opinion it’s the people who will truly place the Philippines at a competitive advantage in the years to come. Before arriving in the country I was familiar with the country’s slogan ‘It’s More Fun in the Philippines’ though I must admit I thought it was a cheesy slogan just like any other. A visit to 3 cities in five days taught me that this slogan really is the best possible description for what you’ll find there! Fiestas in the street, a love of karaoke, friendly neighborhood barbecues, articulate guides and warm hearted generosity seemed in abundance. Even the conferences are more fun, with MICECON proving that tourism conferences don’t always have to be stuffy, formal affairs for the industry of fun and enjoyment. At this year’s event, delegates happily dressed by the theme ‘Flower Power’ and danced their way through the conference lunch!

Given that competition is so tough from neighboring countries, it’s promising that the Filipino government and the wider industry have recognized that they need to start building up their knowledge about Millennials in order to design the right products and marketing messaging for the near future. MICECON was a great first step to doing this.

Toposophy will be there to support them on this journey as they seek more creative ways to engage with Millennials in the future.

This blogpost is from   http://www.toposophy.com/insights/insight/?bid=412

Tourism trends

Special interest tourism experiences

One of the segments with greater growth is no doubt the Special interest travel. Since traveling has become more accessible to most layers of the society, and there is plenty of information available about all types of resources worldwide, passion and mission driven people like to meet other like-minded individuals to share their passion with, to discover new resources related to their hobby or passion, or to expand internationally the impact of the mission they work for. It would be possible to draft an almost endless list of special interest tourism products, but hereby we list just a few to illustrate the concept. These are also usually classified in market niches, like the following:

Wildlife tourism niche. From volunteering to just observation and education, wildlife is a very rich source of memorable experiences and emotions. There are many volunteering programs to help in the protection of endangered species in countries especially rich in biodiversity like Madagascar, Galapagos (Ecuador) or Costa Rica. But you can also volunteer in the Panda Protection Center in Chengdu (China), to help the Panda bears’ carers in the maintenance of the bears’ spaces, prepare their food or collaborate with the veterinaries. Another special case is the Gorilla and Chimpanze protection programs in African countries like Cameroon, Guinea, Kenya, Uganda or Sierra Leone, where there are many centers rescuing these primates to take care of them and foster reproduction. The Jane Goodall Institute is one of the best centers, where they look for professional volunteers to work for long periods of time.

In case you only wish to observe and learn, the options are much varied. From birdwatching in some of the best marshland parks or in times of migration, to a photography safari to learn both about the animals’ life and the art of photography, there is a vast offer available in almost all continents. In this section there could be also included the Diving tourism niche, so long as one of its main attractions is to enjoy the submarine wildlife.

Archeology tourism niche. Films like Indiana Jones have aroused interest and passion for archeology, giving it a sense of fascinating adventure. This has resulted in the development of a considerable offer of tourism products related to it. Visiting historic sites guided by an archeologist and/or a historian making you envision the world in which these buildings and monuments were created is somehow like a trip to the old civilizations. Some of the top destinations in this niche market are Egypt, Mexico –both Maya and Azteca civilizations-, Peru –Inca civilization-, Israel, Greece, Italy, Iran, etc.

Music tourism niche. Beyond traveling to attend a concert or a festival, there are many other possible music motivated holiday programs. There are guided tours visiting the houses of famous musicians, others visiting the backstage of famous venues such as La Scala in Milan, and others visiting museums related to music. Italy, Austria and Germany are the top destinations for this niche market, as they were the nations where most classical musicians were born.

Women issues niche. The agency Focus on women organizes tours to learn about the role of different types of women in all types of societies. This concept encompasses tours to talk with Geishas or Sumo fighters in Japan, meeting with women in the Chii society of Iran who strive to develop themselves despite suffering from serious gender discrimination, talking to women who work to prevent arranged marriages among minor girls in Ethiopia, or talking to women from the Hmong group in Vietnam who open trails in the Sapa valleys in the north of the country.

These four are just a short glimpse of the enormous variety of holiday programs dedicated to special interests related to activity holidays, culture and well-being.

Which are the most original special interest tours you have ever known of?

Tourism trends

Spiritual tourism

Nowadays, destinations need to consider the need for extending their product portfolio with new offers for minor segments and niches, many of which experience interesting growth rates and high loyalty rates. This strategy is also called long tail strategy, so long as it focuses on a long group of small dimensioned market niches. Many destinations have seen how small segments such as wellness, adventure or wine tourism have brought important flows of visitors, including the low seasons.

One of these niche markets with a sustained growth in many outbound markets is the so called Spiritual Tourism. There is not yet an official definition for Spiritual tourism and its market characterization, but it could be defined as activities that lead us to the knowledge of ourselves and our well-being. For instance, the Mexican Tourism Board defines Spiritual Tourism as holidays motivated by issues related to religion, like pilgrimages or journeys with a clear orientation associated to an expression of faith.

This definition would probably not be valid for the European market. I would consider spiritual tourism something between religion and wellness, including even some traces of sport and creative tourism. This concept is defined in Mexico as “Reflection Tourism”, encompassing all types of activities oriented to well-doing while offering inner peace, mysticism and quietness in a relaxed environment.

The lack of consensus on this issue makes it difficult to estimate the niche market dimension, for the only reference continues to be religious tourism, which is estimated to account for more than 300 million of pilgrims who travel annually to holy places or on pilgrimage routes.

This blogpost is from   http://www.visionesdelturismo.es/el-turismo-espiritua/

Collaborative business modelsCollaborative cultureEnvironmental sustainabilitySustainabilityThird sector and social sustainability

Voluntourism, beyond responsible tourism

Responsible tourism, Voluntourism, Sustainable tourism…are different concepts with a common idea: the tourism activity in which the visitor brings positive impacts to the destination, either to alleviate poverty, to help in the development of the local economy, rebuilding areas affected by natural catastrophe, etc.

With regards to the kind of people interested in these types of tourism activities, they are not all moved by the same motivations and goals. The visitor travels either passively (holiday trip + sightseeing), actively (holiday trip + volunteering) or as a volunteer (volunteering trip).

Nowadays, Latin America and Asia are the continents offering most of these programs. There are both outbound and incoming travel agencies specialized in this type of tourism, and some tour operators have developed business units based on responsible tourism, whereas in Africa volunteering holiday programs are more popular than responsible tourism programs.

Also in Eastern Europe some countries are discovering in this type of tourism a new source of revenue for its poorest regions. Other Western countries such as the USA, Germany, France, Spain or Italy have also included strategies for the development of volunteering tourism products in their tourism development plans.

These type of holiday programs let the visitor truly discover the local culture, staying in local homes or accommodation facilities managed by locals, visiting the destination and cooperating in different social projects. Some examples may be:

  • Helping in building homes for refugees or in the poorest areas of the destination
  • Working as a teacher in primary schools or supporting in sport camps for children
  • Cooperating with an NGO dealing with the victims of a natural catastrophe
  • Participating in an ecotourism program where to work in the preservation of the environment

Some portals like Xmigrations.com work as a search engine for activities and accommodation where you may find nature, sport and spiritual activities in places where you can work in exchange for a free stay.

http://www.visionesdelturismo.es/turismo-solidario-y-volunturismo/

Business model innovationCollaborative business modelsCollaborative cultureInnovationTourism trends

Dinner at my home? It’s 30 Euros

What is a SMART destination? These may be defined in many ways. They are destinations that think and advance strategically, improving competitiveness and searching positioning through effectiveness. Becoming a SMART is no more than a strategy to enhance the destination value by leveraging both the cultural and natural heritage, developing innovative resources, improving the efficiency in the production processes and the distribution, which finally propels the sustainable development. This transformation generates positive effects in all sub-sectors such as energy, health services, security, culture, etc. thanks to the cross-destination impact of the tourism activity.

The key concepts that set SMART destinations apart from conventional ones are accessibility, innovation, technology and sustainability. Among these concepts, new technologies are the ones which are more likely to be perceived by the tourist, namely mobile applications, augmented reality and everything related to data smart management.

There are 4 key concepts upon which Smart destinations are developed:

  • Technology/Big Data
    • Innovation
    • Sustainability: social, economic, cultural and environmental
    • Accessibility

The development of the SMART concept in destinations consists mainly in working to attain a higher profitability in the daily exploitation of the resources. This is to be achieved by engaging both the local community and the tourists in order to enhance interaction between them. There are already some examples of Smart destinations, such as El Hierro island in the Canary Archipelago. Some of its main achievements are the energetic self-sufficiency and the pollution reduction, which have been achieved through actions such as:

  • Waste converted into energy
  • Environment camouflage of telecom and energy facilities and equipment (solar panels, antenna, etc.) within the landscape.
  • Reduction of the visual impact in the buildings and facilities construction, by using local volcanic stone instead of bricks.
  • It has gained awareness and branding by sharing and marketing its experiences in the social networks.

Other actions carried out in SMART destinations encompass:

  • Mobile Applications
  • Tourism Intelligence System, including data transportation and information Smart management, which altogether turn the destination into a SMART destination.
  • Smart office; a common working place where to unify processes which produces a work synergy and allows sense and common methodology guidelines in the transformation towards an intelligent city.
  • Beaches with free wifi

It is important to mention Singapore Smart City, which is on the way to become the first SMART nation worldwide. The country is working on its Master Plan for the next 10 years, which will be focused on the development of smart communities propelled by integration and innovation.

This blogpost is based on http://www.visionesdelturismo.es/smart-destinations/

Business model innovationCollaborative business modelsInnovationTourism trends

Guides that are not guides

As has happened with the accommodation business, namely with Airbnb, the collaborative platform business model is also developing in the tourist guides business. I have personally experienced one of these platform’s services in the city of Prague.

Thanks to these platforms it is no longer strange that the tourists are offered free guided tours in great urban destinations, without any trick. In my case, I used the services of Sandeman’s New Europe, which is already present in 18 cities. At the beginning of the tour, the guide explained that his income comes from tips, and so it was not mandatory to pay even 1 Euro.

The tour lasted more than 3 hours and it was really entertaining, with good quality content. The guide was brilliant and received quite a lot of tips. But, attracted by the quality of this Guided tour, the day after I did another one, but paying. This business works actually like a freemium model.  In fact, there are many more businesses offering free guided tours in Prague. And they have their rivalry moves, like guerrilla marketing actions, competing for the best locations, etc.

But this new fashion not only takes place in the large cities. The Greeters movement is emerging also in smaller cities, like Bilbao. The first company operating this business model in Bilbao is actually called Bilbao Greeters, and is part of the international network Global Greeters Network. The Greeters are locals offering guided tours with the authenticity of a local resident’s knowledge and perspective, who knows the traditions, habits and secrets beyond the usual tourist information available. In the Basque Country the Tourist Guides are not regulated, and so there cannot be any conflict in this case. Unlike in the previous case of “New Europe”, the Greeters are not professional guides and do not accept tips.  However, to make a booking you need to be registered as partner, which costs 12€ per year.

Finally, there are many online platforms allowing people to offer their tourist services worldwide. Besides platforms such as Vayable, Viator or Isango, marketing all kind of experiences –from guided tours to cooking lessons-, there are many others offering guided visits by the destination’s residents.

Local Guiding is a platform oriented to “changing the way people travel, experiencing the local life as it is, not like the conventional tourism agencies pretend it to be”. They are already offering guided tours in more than 20 Spanish destinations.

Tours by locals are the veterans in this sector, as they have been operating since 2008 from their headquarters in Vancouver. They nowadays offer guided tours in many countries worldwide.

Like a local is the concept developed through a mobile application. Destination residents contribute to editing the local guide with recommendations, advice, routes, etc. and obtain revenue from the application’s management firm.

Finally, there is the Spanish portal called Ciceroner , promising to offer “unique and personal experiences, the only ones that can be really different and memorable”. It is still in Beta development phase, but it already offers a considerable amount of products in many destinations. It gives the option to gift the guided tours just like Smartbox and many others, but promising a superior experiential value.

As we can see, it is an emergent business model, with many suppliers and intermediaries operating in the market. However, this new fashion business model arouses many questions:

  • Is it just a fashion or a new reality?
  • Are these services for specific segments or for all types of visitors?
  • Is it necessary to further regulate this type of businesses to ensure a fair competition with the traditional models, or should they be given free regin instead?
  • Are these new models going to operate in urban destinations only, or they are likely to operate in beach destinations traditionally dominated by tour-operators?
  • Do these business models affect somehow the destinations’ image? Should the DMOs do something to get some profit from it or to manage it for branding purposes?

I invite you to reflect upon these questions, and encourage you to give your opinion

This blogpost is from http://www.visionesdelturismo.es/guias-que-no-son-guias/

Business trendsEnvironmental sustainabilityInnovationIntelligenceIntelligence methods

Smart destinations

What is a SMART destination? These may be defined in many ways. They are destinations that think and advance strategically, improving competitiveness and searching positioning through effectiveness. Becoming a SMART is no more than a strategy to enhance the destination value by leveraging both the cultural and natural heritage, developing innovative resources, improving the efficiency in the production processes and the distribution, which finally propels the sustainable development. This transformation generates positive effects in all sub-sectors such as energy, health services, security, culture, etc. thanks to the cross-destination impact of the tourism activity.

The key concepts that set SMART destinations apart from conventional ones are accessibility, innovation, technology and sustainability. Among these concepts, new technologies are the ones which are more likely to be perceived by the tourist, namely mobile applications, augmented reality and everything related to data smart management.

There are 4 key concepts upon which Smart destinations are developed:

-Technology/Big Data
-Innovation
-Sustainability: social, economic, cultural and environmental
-Accessibility

The development of the SMART concept in destinations consists mainly in working to attain a higher profitability in the daily exploitation of the resources. This is to be achieved by engaging both the local community and the tourists in order to enhance interaction between them. There are already some examples of Smart destinations, such as El Hierro island in the Canary Archipelago. Some of its main achievements are the energetic self-sufficiency and the pollution reduction, which have been achieved through actions such as:

  • Waste converted into energy
  • Environment camouflage of telecom and energy facilities and equipment (solar panels, antenna, etc.) within the landscape.
  • Reduction of the visual impact in the buildings and facilities construction, by using local volcanic stone instead of bricks.
  • It has gained awareness and branding by sharing and marketing its experiences in the social networks.

Other actions carried out in SMART destinations encompass:

  • Mobile Applications
  • Tourism Intelligence System, including data transportation and information Smart management, which altogether turn the destination into a SMART destination.
  • Smart office; a common working place where to unify processes which produces a work synergy and allows sense and common methodology guidelines in the transformation towards an intelligent city.
  • Beaches with free wifi

It is important to mention Singapore Smart City, which is on the way to become the first SMART nation worldwide. The country is working on its Master Plan for the next 10 years, which will be focused on the development of smart communities propelled by integration and innovation.

This blogpost is based on http://www.visionesdelturismo.es/smart-destinations/

IntelligenceMarketing 3.0Tourism trends

Future tourists

Amadeus has recently presented a survey explaining how the tourists will be in 2030 (Future Travel Tribes 2030). This report has been elaborated with the Future Foundation and through it we can have clues about how tourists will travel in 15 years. Anticipation and knowledge will be the key success factors both for businesses and destinations.

Destination service suppliers, developed products, the means used to provide services and manage revenues, the relationship with the clients and the level of knowledge about them, will play an essential role in satisfying the increasingly exigent customers.

For instance, businesses and destinations with both qualitative and quantitative data about their clients will be able to approach clients optimally before they come to the destination. They will be able to adapt their services and put the surprise effect into practice. The tourist loyalty will be linked to the degree of approach we have towards customers, on how well we know them and how much we can engage with them.

The report presents 6 types of tourists or market segments:

  1. Social capital searchers: they plan their holidays in accordance with their network, experts and others’ recommendations and opinions. In this segment, businesses focusing their marketing through the social networks clearly have an advantage to gain these tourists. Other platforms such as Tripadvisor favor the growth of this segment. There are also many blogs dedicated to traveling with a broad influence in this segment. Destinations usually organize bloggers trips to leverage their influence power as they do with the journalists.

Other initiatives such as Hidden Cash create a partnership between the destination and an operator –airline, train, tour-operator, etc.- to make a campaign promoting both the destination and the operator. For instance, Santiago de Compostela and Easyjet organized a game in which there were 10 hidden flight tickets throughout the city, which generated great buzz in the social networks.

  1. Cultural purists: in this case there are some travel agencies which are capable of crafting a tailored holiday with a high degree of authenticity. This segment’s tourists want to learn everything about the destination, regardless of the discomforts it may entail. This is an opportunity for all those businesses and destinations that may offer experiences related with cultural education, cultural immersion, etc. This corresponds to the type of tourism that used to motivate traveling in the past, focused on learning about the destination, its culture and its people.
  2. Committed travelers: all those businesses and destinations working actively in CSR policies can be considered in this segment. These travelers know that the money they spend during their holiday goes in favor of the local communities’ businesses and its environment, in a way that destinations revenues contribute effectively to the sustainable development of the destination. Therefore, businesses and destinations focused on a mission-driven development are to be the winners in this segment. This type of tourists is also called Tourists 3.0.

A good example may be Hostal Spa Empuries, focused on the environment protection. It is certified with the Leed Gold (certification in sustainable architecture) and works based on the principle of “CradletoCradle” or “C2C”, which entails working with sustainable materials which can be reused after being used for its present purpose in the Hotel architecture.

  1. Comfort lovers: tour-operators and travel agencies working with the traditional package format are to satisfy these segment’s tourists. However, these tourists are likely to be increasingly exigent and clear about the expectations to meet. Therefore, this is an opportunity for the traditional travel agencies and operators, though they will need to gain insightful knowledge about their clients.
  2. Business travelers: innovative businesses providing fast technological solutions are likely to get a good share of this segment’s business. For instance, NH Hoteles, which defines itself as a firm where future is present, works on innovation from the inside, being one of the core values within the corporate culture. That means that they dedicate part of their time to manage internal knowledge, to develop talent within their human resources, and to co-create solutions to their challenges.

NH offers futuristic experiences for the MICE segment. From now on, in some of its hotels, meetings can be held through a 3D holographic technology system, which makes that the image of the person represented by a 3D hologram is present in the meeting in real size. In this way, clients may hold real time meetings as if they were in many places at a time. This service sets NH Hoteles apart as one of the most innovative hotel chains.

Those businesses that understand that time is gold for their clients and find innovative solutions –usually technology based- to save time for their clients are likely to gain a good share of this market segment, one of the most profitable.

  1. Luxury enthusiasts: among the wealthiest clients there will always be a segment of the most exigent, who like to set themselves apart from other travelers by enjoying high end services and experiences. However, these clients are also likely to be among the most loyal, both in good and bad times. Businesses operating in this segment have to bear in mind that for these clients, their holidays are an extraordinary reward, for which they are ready to pay whatever it costs. And they take this type of holidays also to satisfy their need to feel exclusive and to feel that they are doing something unique. There are nowadays many agencies focusing on this type of high-end tourism. Only in Spain, there is Made for Spain, Plenia, Shik Barcelona, Kakdoma Barcelona, Marbella Exclusive, toda la red de agencias Virtuoso, etc.

These are companies usually focused on international targets to whom they offer co-creation of the experience they want to live, ensuring high-end ingredients and exclusivity. The concept for this business is “only for you, and with us”.  For these businesses there is the challenge of catching the luxury trends and being able to offer the best of the best adapted to the clients wishes.

This blogpost is from http://www.visionesdelturismo.es/turistas-del-futuro/

Business model innovationCollaborative business modelsInnovationMarketing 3.0Strategy

The innovation challenge in destinations

Research and innovation will have a fundamental role in the competitive improvement of destinations. Any policy for the destination development has to include a vision and an innovative orientation that brings some sort of competitive advantage.

In the Spanish economy, the tourism industry has proved to be one of the most dynamic sectors, which generates multiplying effects in the local economies in all sub-sectors directly and indirectly related to tourism. This multiplying effect together with the sector’s evolution worldwide has contributed decisively to increase competition, which in turn makes the industry develop strategies oriented towards the improvement of its competitiveness.

The new market after the changes in the offer and demand, requires tailored services and activities, with high quality standards, which makes attaining customer satisfaction more difficult than ever before. In this regard, tourism offer has to be organized according to the targeted market segments requirements in order to be successful. Unlike in past times, market penetration, promotion, price setting, product quality and quantity are variables defined by the demand and not by the offer, for it is necessary that the service and activity production in the tourism sector takes into consideration this new scenario, and so new destination models restructuring the links and relationships between stakeholders are being developed.

In any case, research and innovation will have a fundamental role in the destination’s competitiveness improvement. Any action for the successful development of the destination has to include a vision and an innovative orientation that can generate some kind of competitive advantage. The main challenges to foster competitiveness in destinations are the following:

Innovate in mechanisms and cooperation formulas and strategic partnerships. It is basic to develop mechanisms that work both from the public and the private scope, to boost new cooperation models between businesses and public-private partnership, as a way to gain profitability, dimension and commitment in the development of the tourist sector.

Innovate to improve the sector’s competitiveness. There should be techniques and strategies to improve the business and the destination’s competitiveness. This includes the development of Innovation Plans for the improvement of business models, management models, service processes and the destination’s business marketing.

Innovate for the introduction of new tourism products and consolidating the profitability of the current ones. It will be necessary to foster the creation of unique tourism products based on new business models, build upon the capacities and unique resources of the destination, with a high experiential value, using the ICT and being socially and environmentally friendly.

Leverage the resources and hidden heritage. It is crucial to develop new formulas for leveraging tourism resources that are complementary to the traditional ones, unknown or unexploited, so as to achieve the profitable consolidation so long as they create an outstanding experience and expand the revenue streams.

Innovate in destination’s promotion and communication formulas. There is nowadays a communicational saturation, which makes it necessary to face the future with promotion innovative mechanisms which allow optimization of the destination’s visibility.

Innovate in tourism product marketing. There will have to be developed new methods and tools to market tourism products, in order to favor the sector’s competitive improvement and control the dependence on external channels, in a way that guarantees some influence power. In this context, it is fundamental to develop strategies to improve the intelligence and the knowledge of the products and its results, and the client and its consuming habits.

Innovate in client relationship formulas. The strategy will have to develop new client management formulas. Starting up innovative mechanisms to do CRM is vitally important not only to retain clients, but also to achieve a more effective marketing.

This blogpost is from http://www.visionesdelturismo.es/innovacion-de-los-destinos-turisticos/