Category: Co-creation

Co-creation practices and case studies

Business model innovationCo-creationCollaborative business modelsCollaborative cultureCulture change

Destination Marketing 3.0: Targeting tourists 3.0

Once the Mission, vision and goals are defined, it’s time to think about the necessary strategies to guide our efforts towards the goals. Prior to the mission statement, there has to be a marketing diagnosis to set the starting point from which we intend to achieve all these goals.

Beyond the conventional segmentation criteria according to geographical origin, sociological and motivational profile, the key target group to engage in order to succeed in the marketing 3.0 transformation are the creative activists, also referred to as creative society or tourists 3.0. The challenge is mainly expanding the network of mission driven activists and other like-minded contributors.

These kinds of tourists are more likely to be found in specific communities or social networks, for the conventional marketing channels are not likely to work. They are concerned about the impact of the tourism activity on the environment and the local communities, and are driven by the aim for contribution to make the world a better place, and for spiritual fulfillment above other motivations.

They are activists in the social media either criticizing the brands creating negative impacts on the society and the environment, or promoting brands concerned about positive impacts. Such networks are becoming the main and most trusted source of information for most consumers who increasingly trust other consumers rather than companies. It is through these social networks that consumers share their knowledge and are to share stories about the life-changing experiences offered in the destinations.

Unlike typical passive consumers, tourists 3.0 are willing to take an active role in their relationships with their favorite brands, through co-creation of products and marketing contents. They want to be active players in the brand’s marketing activities, mostly through the social media networks. They are the ones who hold the community’s trust, and so have the power to decide which brands are to be supported.

They are more motivated by self-actualization, which is what unleashes most of their creativity, and by giving them the opportunity to contribute in social and environmental issues the destination is targeting and appealing to their human spirit, their primary motivator. In the destination, they look for authentic experiences through which to develop new skills, learn about new realities, cultures, and ways of life, which open their mindset and ultimately change or influence their life.

Attracting, convincing and engaging them in the mission purpose turns them into brand ambassadors who spread the stories about the destination’s experiences, ultimately expanding the network of brand enthusiasts at no cost to the destination.

Another strategic target is that of the young generations, who may get engaged through special educational programs and game-playing activities. Furthermore, it is interesting to explore the many niches and segments of special interest travelers, characterized by a high educational level, sensitivity towards cultural and environmental issues, and high expenditure in the destination.

What percentage of the desired marketing impacts do you think we can expect from this type of brand ambassadors, compared to the impacts created through conventional marketing in mission driven destinations?

Business model innovationCo-creationMarketing 3.0Open innovationStrategy

Transforming mission driven destinations’ marketing system

Destination marketing 3.0 intends to transform the destination’s marketing system towards a more collaborative and innovative approach empowering all stakeholders to become co-creators and brand ambassadors. In the upcoming blog posts the main components of the Marketing Plan are explained according to the new approach, in order to help the reader envision how Marketing 3.0 changes every aspect of the local destination’s marketing system.

This approach is only applicable to mission driven destinations, like those already oriented towards concepts such as responsible tourism or ecotourism, willing to leverage all the potential of their mission driven purpose to gain more marketing awareness through stakeholder collaboration, new product development and storytelling.

The main trait of the new marketing is that it shifts from vertical to horizontal control, which means consumers are empowered to take the role of brand ambassadors and hence become key players in the brands’ marketing system through their participation in the social networks where they tell stories about their experiences.

Furthermore, Marketing 3.0 considers not only consumers’ functional and emotional needs, but also those related to their human spirit, for values are embedded in the core of the value proposition, promising to deliver positive impacts to the community either in the environmental or socio-cultural sphere through their main business activity, not through philanthropy.

Due to its different nature, a different approach is suggested for Destination Management Organizations (DMO) and Destination Management Companies (DMC) in some sections, as it is mentioned when applicable.

Which do you think are the main challenges of developing these Marketing 3.0 strategies in tourism destinations?

Co-creationMarketing 3.0Tourism marketingTourism trends

Approaching tourism 3.0: Destination marketing 3.0

Marketing 3.0 intends to transform the marketing of mission driven destinations towards a more collaborative and innovative system where all stakeholders are empowered to become co-creators and brand ambassadors. By leveraging the inspirational power of mission driven purposes, stakeholders are expected to contribute to the mission accomplishment through the creation or co-creation of stories, experiences and marketing materials.

When drafting a Marketing 3.0 Plan, the mission is the first challenge to be worked out, in cooperation with the local community and other stakeholders to gain their commitment. Further, it has to depict the vision of how the mission accomplishment transforms the destination, what the destination aspires to become. This vision plays the role of a guiding force to engage stakeholders in contributing to the destination development.

In drafting the marketing strategies, the positioning has to be based on the intended impact of the tourism activity on the stakeholder community, for it to be perceived as a positive force in addressing the community’s concerns and aspirations. Ultimately, profit comes from the appreciation of the business contribution to the community well-being. The positioning has to care about the functional, emotional and spiritual needs of the stakeholders.

The communication strategy is based on enabling connectivity and interactivity between stakeholders to satisfy their will to share and spread their stories. Furthermore, the destination platform should train all stakeholders in creating stories and reward them through story contests and reputation management. On the other hand, it is convenient to communicate the evolution of the key performance indicators related to the mission accomplishment to provide feedback on the stakeholders’ efforts.

The product development is based in co-creation of experiences between local suppliers and other stakeholders. In this regard, all the local community members are empowered to create their own experiences through the open innovation system, which are eventually to be customized for every tourist in co-creation with them.

In business development it is necessary to assess the expected value brought by every kind of channel partner and target client. Beyond the direct profits, every partner or client may bring in some kind of strategic value either in the short or the long term.

Finally, there has to be crafted an internal marketing strategy to engage employees and partners with the vision, mission and values in full commitment to eventually turn them into brand ambassadors. Beyond communicating such vision, mission and values, it is crucial that the destination executives embed these values in their leadership style by delivering a leadership experience through their daily behavior to foster cultural transformation throughout the stakeholder community.

The Whitepaper “Envisioning Destination Marketing 3.0” explains this approach in further detail.

What key challenges do you envision when implementing Marketing 3.0 in local destinations?

Co-creationInnovationMarketing 3.0

Key concepts of tourism 3.0: Co-creation

One of the latest marketing trends affecting many businesses is the increasing will for co-creation on the consumers’ side. The tourism sector is also embracing such trends, leading to customization of experiences, where the tourists may also use their creativity to design the experiences they want to live in the destination.

Following up with the trend of collaborative consumption, this entails co-creation of the experience between the supplier and the tourist, as it is personalized to the will of the client, who usually has plenty of information beforehand on what he wants to experience.

Furthermore, destinations 3.0 empower tourists to participate in co-creation of marketing contents such as photos and mostly stories. Through the social networks, they are entitled to collaborate in creating all sorts of content to share their life-changing stories with their peers.

What challenges do the destinations have to face when developing experiences through co-creation?

Co-creationCollaborative cultureCulture changeInnovative cultureMarketing 3.0

Key concepts of tourism 3.0: Tourists 3.0, the creative society

The main drivers of the socio-cultural change entailing the aforementioned trends are called the “creative society”, hereby referred to as “Tourists 3.0”. Such tourists are concerned about the impact of the tourism activity on the environment and the local communities, and are driven by the aim for contribution to make the world a better place, and for spiritual fulfillment above other motivations, which makes them the primary target to take into account in mission driven destinations.

Tourists 3.0 are engaged in communities and are very active in social media networks, where they are opinion leaders and change agents. Such networks are becoming the main and most trusted source of information for most consumers who increasingly trust other consumers rather than companies. It is through these social networks that consumers share their knowledge and are to share stories about the life-changing experiences offered in the destinations.

Unlike typical passive consumers, tourists 3.0 are willing to take an active role in their relationships with their favorite brands, through co-creation of products and marketing contents. They want to be active players in the brand’s marketing activities, mostly through the social media networks. They are the ones who hold the community’s trust, and so have the power to decide which brands are to be supported.

In the destination, they look for authentic experiences through which to develop new skills, learn about new realities, cultures, and ways of life, which open their mindset and ultimately change or influence his life. These are the so called life-changing experiences that set destinations 3.0 apart from others.

Beyond developing life-changing experiences, what challenges do you think that tourists 3.0 pose to the destination’s executives to leverage all their influence power?