Month: August 2017

Collaborative business modelsCollaborative cultureCulture change

BCG six rules for managing complexity come down to one: make cooperation happen

As it has been explained in previous posts, Destinations 3.0 are developed upon cooperation between a wide variety of agents, encompassing DMO, DMCs, Tour-operators, Government, local suppliers, local community, etc. To make this cooperation work and manage such a complex network of players, the Boston Consulting Group has developed a new approach to managing complexity, called smart simplicity, which hinges on six simple rules. Guess what? All six rules come down to just one: make cooperation happen.

How do companies create value and achieve competitive advantage in an age of increasing complexity? That’s the question authors of “Six Simple Rules” Yves Morieux and Peter Tollman try to answer. For them, the winners of the new much more complex context will be the companies that can transform complexity into competitive advantage. For that to occur, they provide six managerial rules that go for companies, managers and employees with less-direct control, fewer systems, more flexibility and more autonomy. If read carefully, all six are about increasing cooperation at organizations, but three of them talk about it more directly.

Rule number two is “Look for Cooperation”Authors ask managers to find out how cooperation happens and who makes it happen; identify the “integrators”, the people and units who bring others together and drive processes; and eliminate layers and rules and give these integrators the power, authority, and incentives to make the entire task succeed.

“Six Simple Rules” differentiate between Cooperation and Collaboration. For them collaboration is about teamwork and good interpersonal relationships, which could even lead to the avoidance of real cooperation. Cooperation is a demanding activity that involves taking individual risks because individual contributions to the joint output can’t be directly measured. People only cooperate when, by cooperating, they can win as individuals. “Remove managerial positions if they don’t influence people to cooperate”, authors advise.

Rule number four: “Increase Reciprocity” (to make cooperation happen). Instead of relying on dedicated interfaces, coordination structures, or procedures, authors recommend managers to increase reciprocity, which ensures that people have a mutual interest in cooperation (as their success depends on each other). “Reciprocity makes people cooperate more autonomously and, therefore, makes organizational life simpler.”

And finally, rule number six: “Reward Those Who Cooperate”. If people think cooperation is risky, make it riskier not to cooperate. Most organizations punish failure. But that can make people risk averse. The challenge is to encourage risk taking that improves performance.  For Yves Morieux and Peter Tollman the solution is encouraging cooperation. “People take personal risk, and risk becomes fruitful for the company, when they know they can count on others to compensate, relay, absorb, or provide a safety net in case things go wrong”, they consider.

The original article is available at Why Managers Need the Six Simple Rules

This article is from www.co-society.com/half-bcg-six-rules-better-simpler-management-cooperation/

Collaborative business modelsCollaborative cultureCulture changeInnovationInnovative culture

A fresh outlook to public-private sectors relationship where a Co- mindset is key

Since the latest global financial crisis, new evidences prove the mindset shift ingrained in the private sectors in accordance with the trends of Marketing 3.0, namely referring to the business mission driven purpose and the cooperation between businesses and also with governments. This article deepens in the new role of governments in this new paradigm. For Willian D. Eggers and Paul Macmillan, authors of The Solution Revolution, it’s time to contemplate a fresh outlook to public-private sectors relationship where a Co- mindset and practice is key.

As tough societal problems persist and government budgets tighten, citizens, social enterprises, and even businesses, are relying less and less on government-only solutions. The Solution Revolution describes how, as the subtitle puts it, “business, government and social enterprises are teaming up to solve society’s toughest problems”.

These wavemakers range from edgy social enterprises to mega-foundations that are eclipsing development aid, to Fortune 500 companies delivering social good on the path to profit. In order to make the biggest impact, they have started to think holistically about their role and their relation to other players, not as competitors fighting over an ever-shrinking pie, but as potential collaborators. By erasing public-private sector boundaries, they are unlocking trillions of dollars in social benefit and commercial value.

For the “Solution Economy” new players, government is an essential part of the solution but government’s role have to change dramatically. The traditional boundaries between public and private sector should blur in order to get better results when dealing with social problems. There are some on both sides of the divide who doubt whether there should be such a divide at all. They are realizing that each sector stands to do better with a little help from the other.

Fortunately, as The Solution Revolution points out, international companies are increasingly seeking “progressive structures” through which co-operation is endorsed and regulations are created to engender higher levels of trust and mutual interest between companies, sectors, supply chains and markets.

Thus, the business world is undergoing such profound change that a fundamental rethink of the relationship between companies and governments is required. For instance, the so called “Purpose Economy” or “Purpose-Driven companies” where a new CSR mindset is less about PR and more about looking at problems as opportunities, including social problems as education, water, low-cost healthcare, sanitation, recycling, or reducing traffic congestion.

The Solution Revolution examines scores of examples of how this kind of Co- approach is already solving social problems. Here are some of them:

  • Recyclebank turned recycling into a game by uniting cities, citizens and companies around a system of exchange and rewards. Citizens are encouraged to recycle more by earning points that can be redeemed for discounts and deals on products and services from Recyclebank’s network of more than 100 corporate sponsors.
  • Unilever created an entire ecosystem of diverse partners to address an urgent sanitation problem affecting more than 600 million poor Indians. It acted as a partner with NGOs, banks and schools to create a profitable market for cleaning products in rural India.
  • NASA partnered with SpaceX and other private space companies when fiscal constraints shut down the agency’s space shuttle programs. SpaceX’s unmanned Dragon capsule successfully docked on the international space station in May 2012.

You may find the original article in The Solution Revolution

This article is from www.co-society.com/fresh-outlook-public-private-sectors-relationship-co-mindset-key

Beyond the proposed destination models 3.0, which other public-private partnerships do you envision for tourism destinations?

Marketing 3.0Storytelling training & case studiesTourism marketing

Storytelling marketing for the Santiago Way’s pilgrimage

One of the worldwide famous life-changing experience destination is the Santiago Way, a pilgrimage route that revived two decades ago from the middle age. It was first developed through the local Government’s investment in hospitality facilities and promotion, and from then on through word of mouth and high-profile storytelling, including many films.

Even if the experience concept is apparently simple –mostly considering that most pilgrims do not have religious motivations-, it turns to be a memorable social experience where you meet people from all walks of life, from all nationalities and ages, but in all cases everybody has an open mind and a noble heart, unlike most of us are used to in our daily lives. Unlike most other holiday concepts, this one is essentially a social experience which is totally flexible in the way that you can start and finish when and where you prefer to, and you can improvise your journey every day.

The intense conviviality along the whole journey when walking and once arrived in the destination hostel sets the stage for multiple kinds of stories about friendship, self-discovery and awareness, transferring wisdom, and love, among many others that you can imagine.

Such a life-changing experience scenario has inspired many celebrities in writing books and making films. Such is the case of Paulo Coelho –Brazilian bestseller author- with his book “El Peregrino de Compostela”, which brought a considerable flow of Brazilian pilgrims; or Hape Kerkeling –German Showman- with his book and film “I’m off then” which also brought large flows of German visitors. Other cases are Shirley Maclaine with her book “The Way” or Charlie Sheen in a film with the same name. This is a benchmark case study to illustrate how life-changing experiences inspire stories up to high-profile storytelling.

Nowadays, the local DMO do not need to invest in promotion anymore. The storytelling machine works itself and The Way has revived many areas which were literally abandoned. Beyond the main route, where all these media stories take place, many other Santiago Ways have been developed taking advantage of The Way’s enthusiasts boom, thus reviving the other historical pilgrimage routes to Santiago de Compostela coming from different points of the Iberian Peninsula.

Do you know of other similar cases?

Business model innovationBusiness trendsCollaborative business modelsCollaborative cultureCulture change

Business ecosystems come of age

As it has been explained in many posts and Whitepapers, one of the key success factors of destinations in their evolution towards the Vision of Tourism 3.0 is to develop an innovation ecosystem integrated by different types of contributors. In that regard, Business Trend Series Deloitte’s report Business ecosystems come of age presents a series of articles describing how businesses are moving beyond traditional industry silos and conjoining networked ecosystems, creating new opportunities for innovation.

The report offers a glimpse of how some view the rise of ecosystems as an opportunity for creating powerful new competitive advantage as it becomes increasingly possible for firms to deploy and activate assets they neither own nor control and expand the possible beyond of their expertise and activities.

This brief summary outlines the various subjects and ideas dealt with:

Introduction: A brief history of the concept of ecosystems applied to business and how it all started in the technology sector but now is also taking root far beyond.

Blurring boundaries, uncharted frontiers: Long-standing boundaries and constraints that have traditionally determined the evolution of business are dissolving, allowing new ecosystem possibilities to flourish.

Wicked opportunities: Many kinds of complex, dynamic, and seemingly intractable social challenges are being reframed and attacked with renewed vigor through ecosystems formed by unprecedented networks of NGOs, social entrepreneurs, governments, and even businesses coalescing around them.

Regulating ecosystems: Regulators are challenged to create policies and solutions that protect the public’s interests and are also dynamic enough to keep pace with innovation born through ecosystems.

Supply chains and value webs: A set of powerful developments have worked together to help transform the business environment, changing how supply chains are configured, further heightening their strategic significance for many firms, and creating new leadership imperatives for the years ahead. Now “companies don’t compete—supply chains do.”

The new calculus of corporate portfolios: The rise of business ecosystems is compelling strategists to value assets according to an additional calculus, often generating different conclusions about what should be owned.

The power of platforms: Properly designed business platforms can help create and capture new economic value and scale the potential for learning across entire ecosystems.

Minimum viable transformation: Business model transformations are not unprecedented, they have always happened. It is not even new that business model transformations must consider the evolution of a company’s broader ecosystem. What is new today is that such transformations must be considered and accomplished routinely—not as storm-of-the-century events.

You may download the document at Business ecosystems come of age

This article is from www.co-society.com/official-business-ecosystems-come-age-deloitte-confirmed/

Business model innovationCo-creationCollaborative business modelsInnovationMarketing 3.0

Case study: Trip4real. Tourism experience collaborative business model

Trip4real is a paradigmatic example of how the collaborative economy flourishes in new business models for the tourism industry. Founded in Barcelona by Gloria Molins, it connects local experience developers with tourists eager to discover the destination through tailored experiences for them. Trip4real is a collaborative platform where any local may market a tourism experience to help the tourist discover the destination from a particular point of view or live special interest experiences.

The platform acts like a marketplace and also as an intermediary, so the payment is controlled by the platform and it gets a commission out of it. After the payment is done, the supplier and the client are connected to meet and live the experience. The motivation behind this business model is the will of the tourists for discovering the destination off the beaten track, where the locals go, and the hidden secrets that cannot be found in the Guides, as well as the authenticity brought by the interactivity with locals, who facilitate a deeper understanding about the local culture.

The first platform was developed for Barcelona, but other platforms have been developed in Madrid, Lisbon, London, Paris, Rome, Dublin, Berlin, Amsterdam, Edinburgh and a handful of Spanish destinations.

As has happened with Uber, do you think that these business models may be treated as unfair competitors to the local “official” tour guides and incoming agencies? Do you think there should be any kind of restrictions to letting it legally compete with standard tourism service suppliers?
You may check further details at www.trip4real.com